Friday, July 25, 2008

OBT: Randy Pausch

'Last lecture' professor dies of cancer Randy Pausch, famed for his life-affirming message, passes at 47 The Associated Press, updated 10:13 a.m. CT, Fri., July. 25, 2008

PITTSBURGH - Randy Pausch, a computer science professor whose "last lecture" about facing terminal cancer became an Internet sensation and a best-selling book, has died. He was 47.

Pausch died early Friday at his home in Virginia, said Anne Watzman, a spokeswoman for Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh where he worked. Pausch and his family moved there last fall to be closer to his wife's relatives.

Pausch was diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer in September 2006. His popular last lecture in September 2007 garnered international attention and was viewed by millions on the Internet.

In it, Pausch celebrated living the life he had always dreamed of instead of concentrating on impending death.

"The lecture was for my kids, but if others are finding value in it, that is wonderful," Pausch wrote on his Web site. "But rest assured; I'm hardly unique."

The book "The Last Lecture," written with Jeffrey Zaslow, leaped to the top of the nonfiction best-seller lists after its publication in April and remains there this week. Pausch said he dictated the book to Zaslow, a Wall Street Journal writer, by cell phone. The book deal was reported to be worth more than $6 million.

Flamboyance and showmanship
At Carnegie Mellon, he was a professor of computer science, human-computer interaction and design, and was recognized as a pioneer of virtual reality research. On campus, he became known for his flamboyance and showmanship as a teacher and mentor.

The speech last fall was part of a series Carnegie Mellon called "The Last Lecture," where professors were asked to think about what matters to them most and give a hypothetical final talk. The name of the lecture series was changed to "Journeys" before Pausch spoke, something he joked about in his lecture.

"I thought, damn, I finally nailed the venue and they renamed it," he said.

He told the packed auditorium he fulfilled almost all his childhood dreams — being in zero gravity, writing an article in the World Book Encyclopedia and working with the Walt Disney Co.

The one that eluded him? Playing in the National Football League.

"If I don't seem as depressed or morose as I should be, sorry to disappoint you," Pausch said.

He then joked about his quirky hobby of winning stuffed animals at amusement parks — another of his childhood dreams — and how his mother introduced him to people to keep him humble: "This is my son, he's a doctor, but not the kind that helps people."

Pausch said he was embarrassed and flattered by the popularity of his message. Millions viewed the complete or abridged version of the lecture, titled "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams," online.

Pausch lobbied Congress for more federal funding for pancreatic cancer research and appeared on "Oprah" and other TV shows. In what he called "a truly magical experience," he was even invited to appear as an extra in the new "Star Trek" movie.

He had one line of dialogue, got to keep his costume and donated his $217.06 paycheck to charity.

Pausch blogged regularly about his medical treatment. On Feb. 15, exactly six months after he was told he had three to six months of healthy living left, Pausch posted a photo of himself to show he was "still alive & healthy."

Last lecture in November
"I rode my bike today; the cumulative effects of the chemotherapy are hurting my stamina some, but I bet I can still run a quarter mile faster than most Americans," he wrote.

Pausch gave one more lecture after his Carnegie Mellon appearance — in November at the University of Virginia, where he had taught from 1988 to 1997.

Pausch often emphasized the need to have fun.

"I mean I don't know how to not have fun. I'm dying and I'm having fun. And I'm going to keep having fun every day I have left. Because there's no other way to play it," he said in his Carnegie Mellon lecture.

Born in 1960, Pausch received his bachelor's degree in computer science from Brown University and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon.

He co-founded Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center, a master's program for bringing artists and engineers together. The university named a footbridge in his honor. He also created an animation-based teaching program for high school and college students to have fun while learning computer programming.

In February, the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences in California announced the creation of the Dr. Randy Pausch Scholarship Fund for university students who pursue careers in game design, development and production.

He and his wife, Jai, had three children, Dylan, Logan and Chloe.

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Thursday, July 24, 2008

ENV: Monkey Eagle shot

Philippine farmer eats rare eagle
By Steve Jackson, BBC News

Prosecutors in the Philippines have been told to file charges against a farmer for killing and eating one of the world's rarest eagles.

The man faces up to 12 years in jail if he is found guilty of shooting the Philippine eagle earlier this month.

The bird is among the largest and most powerful eagles on Earth but it is also critically endangered.

Conservationists believe there are fewer than 250 adult birds left in the wild.

The story of what happened to one juvenile eagle in the southern Philippines has received widespread attention.

The remains of the bird were found in a national park two weeks ago.

The eagle had been rescued from captivity in 2006 and reintroduced into the wild in March this year with a tracking device.

When wildlife officials noticed that it had not moved for some time they began a search and found its skeleton and the transmitter under a tree.

A 22-year-old farmer, Brian Balaon, later came forward to say he had shot the eagle with an air gun and had eaten it with his friends. He said he did not know it was an endangered species.

But the Philippine environment secretary has called for the farmer to be punished severely to show that the authorities are serious about enforcing the wildlife protection laws.

If the farmer is found guilty he could be jailed for between six and twelve years.

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Tuesday, July 22, 2008

REV: High School Musical

Musical phenomenon comes to the Point
By Claudia Sullivan, The Daily Times, Published July 19, 2008

In 2006, television viewers were swept away by an event from which we still feel the aftershock. It wasn’t an earthquake. It wasn’t a hurricane. It was the Disney Channel television movie original, “High School Musical,” and we (especially if you are younger than 25 years of age) have never been the same.

“High School Musical” has evolved into numerous television competitive shows, has sparked a new fashion tradition, and has people singing and dancing their little hearts out to a series of pop songs that can’t keep you still. “High School Musical” definitely is for the young and young-at-heart.

The Point’s current production, under the direction of talented Point veteran Melissa May-Moncus, is energetic, lively, fun and full of a large cast of inspired young people who fill the night air with big sounds and seem to be having more fun than anyone can imagine.

“High School Musical” is a bit short on plot. Some have compared it to Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” but the comparison falls short of any similarity except in this production the high school drama group is preparing a production of “Juliet and Romeo.”

Our young heroes are Troy played by Jamin Reither and Gabriella Montez played by Andrea Deleon. They aren’t exactly “star-crossed” but they do come from different worlds, and there is a hint that their families wouldn’t approve of their budding romance.

They meet. They sing. They fall in love and decide to take their singing love on stage in the (of course) high school musical. Reither and Montez are wonderful. They are both comfortable on stage, at ease with singing love songs and carry the pop-style of big throated, belt-out-the-song just fine. And in the few quiet moments, they are equally believable and on the mark.

Montez, a newcomer to the Point stage, is a delightful surprise. She seems to belong on the stage. Her voice is, for the most part, one of the highlights of the show. Reither, from last year’s “Oklahoma!” has an innocence that works well with the “jock,” big man on campus persona of his character. These two are a bit more Tony and Maria from “West Side Story” than the original comparison. Well done, these two, and well done for the entire cast.

Another little show-stopper comes in the form of young Jonathan Martinez, who plays multiple parts, but who has a remarkable energy on stage and brings a smile each time he enters.

All in all, May-Moncus’ choreography is tireless. The entire cast jumps and dances and wiggles their way through each number as though they had been on the road for months. Where do they get the energy? Ah, yes. Remember, these are high school students, and when there is music and a wide open stage, you just can’t keep them from dancing.

Musical direction under Tim Wilborn is just right. His group provides the right touch, from big all-cast song blasters to the melodious love songs. “High School Musical” doesn’t give us hummable tunes like the more classic American musicals, but the score will certainly get your toes a tappin’ and your feet a movin.’

The Point’s “High School Musical” is a must-see. You can’t help but smile, and although the show misses the nostalgia factor present in other plots set in high school such as “Grease” and “Bye Bye Birdie,” this one does have the band, the back stabbing, the cute cheerleaders and a happy ending.

So go to the river on one of these starlit nights and cheer for the home team (there is a championship basketball game, too), and swoon when the guy gets the girl in spite of the odds, and remember what it was like to have all that energy.

Claudia Sullivan is a professor of drama at Schreiner University.

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Friday, July 18, 2008

COM: High School Musical Finally!

Tonight the hugely popular nusical for a new generation "High School Musical" opens at the Point Theatre. Lovingly directed by Melissa May Moncus it features a huge cast of talented young actors from as far away as Austin and San Marcos. "The Voice of GSQ" Charles Bryant appears as Chad, and future GSQ actor Jamin Reither appears in the lead.

HCAF notes: After months of rehearsals, Disney's smash hit, "High School Musical," comes to life July 18 - August 2 on the Hill Country Arts Foundation Point Theatre outdoor stage. The musical, written by Peter Barsocchini, will have nine performances over three weekends at 8:30 p.m. Opening night will feature a post-show reception to meet the cast and crew. For those who are not familiar with "High School Musical," it is the story of a high school basketball star, Troy; and a brainy transfer student, Gabriella, who want to audition for their school's spring musical, but are discouraged by rival peer groups. The play has been described as being part "West Side Story," part "Romeo and Juliet," and part "Grease." According to David Simpatico, who wrote the book for the stage version, the message of "High School Musical," is "you can be whatever you want to be." Director Melissa May-Moncus, a Point Theatre alumnus, has assembled a cast of 31 to perform the difficult score and complicated dance routines. Jamin Reither, who appeared as Curly in "Oklahoma!" last summer, will star as Troy Bolton; and Andrea DeLeon, a recent Tivy High School graduate, will make her Point Theatre debut as Gabriella Montez.Point Theatre interns Jenny Anne Canfield and Bobby Dale Sands will portray siblings Sharpay and Ryan Evans. Charles Bryant, whose last appearance on The Point's outdoor stage was the Prince in "Cinderella," will take on the role of Chad; and Travis Taylor, who recently played one of the sons in "Alone Together," plays Zeke. Taylor will be played by newcomer Jasmin Delacerda. Sunday, July 20 is Family Night at The Point. All tickets will be $5. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) Services for the deaf and hearing impaired will be available on Saturday, July 26, courtesy of support from the Kerr County United Way. Tickets are selling quickly for this production according to box office staff. For reservations or more information, call the box office at 830-367-5121 or visit the web site at www.hcaf.com. The Point Theatre is located at 120 Point Theatre Road South in Ingram.

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Thursday, July 17, 2008

COM: High School Musical

The Point opens 'High School Musical'
By Carlina Villalpando, The Daily Times, Published July 17, 2008

INGRAM — If TV and popular culture are any indicator to the success of the Point Theatre’s next show, it’s destined to be a huge success. The Ingram theater will open the stage version of Disney’s hit, “High School Musical,” at 8:30 p.m. Friday on the Hill Country Arts Foundation Point Theatre outdoor stage.

The musical, written by Peter Barsocchini and directed by Melissa May-Moncus, will run through Aug. 2, with nine performances over three weekends at 8:30 p.m.

“High School Musical: On Stage!,” is based on the Disney channel original movie, which enjoyed record-breaking success when it hit TV in early 2006. It was an instant sensation, enthralling teenagers with memorable characters including Troy Bolton, the basketball star, and Gabriella Montez, the brainy transfer student. The story revolves around Troy and Gabriela’s auditions for their school’s spring musical, despite being discouraged by rival peer groups. It’s a plot that’s earned the story comparisons with aspects of “West Side Story,” “Romeo and Juliet” and “Grease.”

May-Moncus said she is “thrilled to be back at The Point” directing the cast that has been rehearsing since late May. She said she is especially excited that this show includes many new actors.

“The Point will always feel like home,” she said. “It’s where I discovered my love of theater. One of my greatest joys is that we have a lot of people in this show who are new to theater.”

When asked what she liked best about this show, May-Moncus said, “I really enjoy the music, I think everyone will. And, it’s excellent family entertainment.”

About the director

May-Moncus first appeared on the Point stage in the summer of 1983 in “Guys and Dolls.” Since then, she has played many roles at The Point, including Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz,” Sally Bowles in “Cabaret,” Molly Brown in ‘The Unsinkable Molly Brown” and Rosie Alvarez in “Bye Bye Birdie.” She also has directed and choreographed “Nunsense,” “Annie,” “Kiss Me Kate!” and most recently the 2002 Point production of “Brigadoon.”

Fun for families

Sunday is Family Night at The Point, when all tickets will be $5, even adults who usually pay $12. Communication Access Realtime Translation Services for the deaf and hearing impaired will be available on Saturday, July 26, courtesy of support from the Kerr County United Way.

For reservations or more information on the show, call the Point Theatre box office at 367-5121 or visit the Web site at www.hcaf.com. The Point Theatre is located at 120 Point Theatre Road South in Ingram.

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ATH: Wambach out for Olympics

Wambach Will Miss Olympics

The US Women’s National Team got another 1-0 win over Brazil with an 85th minute goal from Natasha Kai, but the game was overshadowed by Abby Wambach breaking her leg in the 31st minute.

Wambach was taken to Sharp Memorial Hospital where X-Rays confirmed the fracture in her left leg. She will have surgery tomorrow morning to have a titanium rod inserted. She will be on crutches for several weeks before the leg is weight-bearing, at which time she will start rehabilitation. Injuries of this sort usually require a 12-week recovery.

The US now faces the Olympics minus Wambach.

“I want to thank all the fans, the doctors, the players on the team and Tasha Kai for scoring the winning goal,” said Wambach from the emergency room. ”Obviously, it’s devastating, but above everything else, I’m only one player, and you can never win a championship with just one player. I have the utmost confidence in this team bringing home the gold.”

As for the game, Natasha Kai came on as a 56th minute substitute, and got the winner from a Carli Lloyd freekick. It was Kai’s 12th goal of the year and 20th of her international career.


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Wednesday, July 16, 2008

COM: Oldest Family Tree

Two Germans Share World's Longest Family Tree
The Two Men Recently Discovered They Were Related Through a 3,000-Year-Old Ancestor
By CHRISTEL KUCHARZ, PASSAU, ABC News, Germany, July 16, 2008


Two Germans share the longest proven family tree in the world.

The men, Manfred Huchthausen, a 58-year-old teacher, and Uwe Lange, a 48-year-old surveyor, had known each other from living in the same village, about half a mile apart from each other.

But they never knew they were related through a 3,000-year-old shared ancestor.

They only recently found out they are both true descendants of Bronze Age cave-dwellers who lived in the area three millenniums ago.

Thanks to a DNA test on well-preserved Bronze Age bones found in the Lichtenstein cave in the foothills of the Harz Mountains in Germany's Lower Saxony, the men can now claim to have the longest family tree in the world.

"Before the discovery, I could trace my family back by name to 1550," Lange said. "Now, I can go back 120 generations."

Lange comes from the small village of Nienstedt, which is near the excavation site.

"We used to play there as kids," he told ABC News. "If I'd known that there were 3,000-year-old relatives buried there, I would not have set a foot in that cave."

A local team of archaeologists discovered the L. cave, which had been hidden from view, in 1980. But it wasn't until 1993 that they found the Bronze Age remains.

The cave was used between 1,000 and 700 B.C., according to archaeological investigations conducted by scientists at the nearby University of Goettingen. One of them, anthropologist Susanne Hummel, confirmed that Huchthausen and Lange share the longest proven family tree.

They found the bones of 23 people -- nine females and 14 males -- along with what appeared to be cult objects, prompting speculation among scientists that the cave was a living area and a sacrificial burial place.

Scientists found that the bones had been protected from the elements by calcium deposits that formed a protective skin around the skeletons.

The remains turned out to be from the same family group that had a distinctive and rare DNA pattern.

When 300 locals were tested with saliva swabs as part of the archaeological research, two local residents turned out to have the exact same genetic characteristics: Manfred Huchthausen and Uwe Lange.

"I could not believe this at first, but I think it's truly fascinating," Huchthausen, whose family has lived in the area since the 18th century, told ABC News.

The skulls have been reconstructed using 3-D computer techniques and are now placed at a museum in nearby Bad Grund.

Huchthausen has been to the museum, saying he found it "awesome" to see his ancestors.

He said he has received many calls from across Germany since the archaeologists published their findings.

"People are interested to find out what it is like to be able to trace back the family roots for 3,000 years, and I can tell them, it's awesome, it's sensational, it's fascinating."

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ATH: US Scholar-Athlete Games


United States Scholar-Athlete Games to Open on June 28


The United States Scholar-Athlete Games will open on June 28. The Institute for International Sport has put together an extraordinary group of speakers, headed by General Colin Powell. General Powell will deliver the U. S. Scholar-Athlete Games keynote address on Tuesday,
July 1.


General Colin Powell

Senator George Mitchell





  • Click here to review the full schedule of U.S. Scholar-Athlete Games events.
  • Click here to read a wonderful piece by Mike Szostak which appeared in the Providence Journal on June 22. The piece will provide you with a clear idea of the impact of the Scholar-Athlete Games on participants.
  • Click here to purchase tickets to General Powell's July 1 speech. Click here to purchase tickets to the closing ceremonies on July 4.
  • Click here to read a wonderful article which appeared in the Providence Journal on June 12 regarding Senator George Mitchell's launch address. This article makes clear Senator Mitchell's strong support of the Institute for International Sport and Scholar-Athlete Games.

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ATH: FIFA Rankings


FIFA World Rankings

(Jun 4, 2008) USSoccerPlayers -- The United States stay 21st in the FIFA World Rankings for the third month in a row, holding onto their highest position in 2008. The US lost to England 2-0 during this rankings period. They play Spain, Argentina, and home and away World Cup Qualifiers against Barbados during the next rankings period.

The next FIFA rankings will be published on August 6th.

FIFA World Rankings: July 2008
Rank
Team
Points
1
Spain 1557
2
Italy
1404
3
Germany
1364
4
Brazil
1344
5
Holland
1299
6
Argentina
1298
7
Croatia 1282
8
Czech Republic
1146
9
Portugal
1104
10
France
1053
11
Russia
1023
12
Romania
1021
13
Cameroon 1011
14
Turkey 1010
15
England 1003
16
Scotland 988
17
Bulgaria 930
18
Greece 911
19
Mexico 906
20
Ghana 885
30 United States 780


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MSC: Living History Day Call

CALLING ALL INTERESTED TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS AND STUDENTS

YOU ARE INVITED!!

The Center for Innovative Learning, Schreiner University, Texas Heritage Music Foundation and Past is Prologue invite you to put these dates on your calendar for Fall 2008. These events are educational in nature and provide teachers and students with enrichment opportunities.


Friday, September 26, 2008
Texas Heritage Living History Day
The Robbins-Lewis Pavilion on Schreiner University campus
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. FREE Admission

Over 70 performers, including cowboy music, stories and tall tales; Texas songwriters and storytellers; Texas Camel Corps; chuck wagons and teepees; gospel music; history re-enactors and demonstrators; Institute of Texan Cultures and Texas Folklore Society; and much, much more! Free comprehensive educator’s packets available at the event.

Also on Friday, after the main event:
Texas Folklore Society Discussion Panel Subject: Songs of Texas
The Cailloux Student Activity Center Theater on Schreiner University campus
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. FREE Admission
www.texasheritagemusic.org

______________________

October 17-18, 2008
Past is Prologue Workshop: Using Native American Stories and Tools for Learning
Friday, October 17: Storytelling and Panel Discussion 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday, October 18: Workshop 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
www.learningpeople.org

CEU’s available for teachers

________________________

First Wednesday of Each Month, September through November
Texas Music Coffeehouse Series
The Lion’s Den in the Cailloux Student Activity Center, Schreiner University
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. FREE Admission
www.texasheritagemusic.org



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MSC: Walt Wilkins in Marble Falls this weekend!

From our good friends in Marble Falls:

Sam Baker & Walt Wilkins

We’ll Take Europe Show
Uptown Marble Theater July 20, 2008

The Uptown Marble Theatre and GTT Entertainment proudly bring a preview of what two of America’s finest poets will be unleashing on the Old World. Walt Wilkins and Sam Baker are heading out on a three week trek across Europe to play the songs, tell the stories and paint the pictures using only words, six steel strings and two lifetimes of experiences most people just read about. The setting for this collage of verbal visuals is the beautiful Uptown Marble Theater, 218 Main Street, Marble Falls Texas. The show is a Sunday matinee and starts at 2:00 PM. Tickets are $12.00 in advance, $15.00 day of show, and are available online at www.uptownmarble.com, by phone at 830-693-9996, or at the R-Bar & Grill, 904 3rd St, Marble Falls, TX. Call the theater for information about limited table seating in front of the stage for n $20.

Walt Wilkins has been called the heir apparent to the Texas Songwriters legacy tradition established by Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt and Billy Joe Shaver. His 2007 CD release (Diamonds in the Sun Palo Duro Records) with the Hill Country Super Band “The Mystiqueros” strengthens Wilkins’ reputation as a strong performer and band leader. Holding a place on the Americana Music Chart for over 50 weeks since the debut in 2007 (with 9 weeks in the top 10) is only one more example of the large net that Walt Wilkins’ talent throws. Chet Flippo of CMT’s website calls Diamonds “one of the Top 10 Best of 2007”. The CD made several “Top of 2007” lists.

Sam Baker may not be a household name in the U.S…..That may be by design. Sam’s two independently released CDs “Mercy” and “Pretty World” have enjoyed amazing acceptance in Europe with “Pretty World” Charting at #1 before it was even released in the United States. Both Recordings were Co-Produced by Wilkins. Joining Walt & Sam may be various Mystiqueros and some special other suprized guests.

www.sambakermusic.com
www.waltwilkins.com

For tickets and info go to www.uptownmarble.com or call 830-693-9996.



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NAT: Athapaskan Migration

Athapaskan Migration To Southwest U.S. Illuminated With Y Chromosome Study
ScienceDaily (July 15, 2008)

A large-scale genetic study of native North Americans offers new insights into the migration of a small group of Athapaskan natives from their subarctic home in northwest North America to the southwestern United States. The migration, which left no known archaeological trace, is believed to have occurred about 500 years ago.

The study, led by researchers at the University of Illinois, is detailed this month in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. It relied on a genetic analysis of the Y chromosome and so offers a window on the unique ancestral history of the male Athapaskan migrants. Previous genetic studies of this group focused on mitochondrial DNA, which is passed down exclusively from mothers to their offspring.

The new findings reinforce the hypothesis that the Athapaskan migration involved a relatively small group that nonetheless was very successful at assimilating and intermixing with native groups already living in the southwest. The newcomers were so influential that the Athapaskan language family now dominates many parts of the Southwest. Now called Apacheans, the Navajo and Apache descendants of the early migrants are dispersed throughout the central Southwest and speak languages closely related to the Chipewyan, an Athapaskan language found in the subarctic.

(Language studies also revealed that Athapaskans migrated to the northwest U.S. and settled on the coast in parts of California and Oregon.)

How the Athapaskan migrants were able to spread their language -- and genes -- so successfully is unknown. Anthropologists note that the migrants probably arrived in the Southwest at a time of stress among indigenous groups as a result of an extended drought.

The new study also revealed how pervasively European males intermixed with native groups, said principal investigator Ripan Malhi, a molecular anthropologist in the department of anthropology at Illinois.

"A lot of the Y chromosomes have been replaced by European males," he said.

Malhi and his colleagues looked at specific regions on the Y chromosome that can vary from person to person. Tiny differences in the sequence of nucleotides that spell out the genetic code can be used to determine whether -- and how closely -- individuals are related to one another. Those who share many of these genetic signatures are more likely to share a recent common ancestor than those who don't.

The researchers analyzed 724 Y chromosomes from 26 native populations in North America. By including groups from across the continent (they studied tribes from Alaska to the Yucatan Peninsula and eastward to Hudson Bay and southeast U.S.), the researchers were able to analyze genetic differences among many native groups and to get an idea of the degree of European male infiltration into the native gene pool.

Consistent with a previous study of native North American mitochondrial DNA (also led by Malhi), the new analysis found a pattern that indicates that a small group of subarctic Athapaskans miYgrated to the Southwest. This pattern is reflected in the fact that many Apacheans carry the genetic signature of a small subset of subarctic Athapaskans.

These findings also affirm an earlier study of variants of a particular protein, albumin, in different native groups. That study showed that while many Apacheans carried an albumin variant common among natives in the Southwest and Mesoamerica, some Apacheans were the only ones to carry a variant that also occurs in subarctic populations.

Other patterns emerged from the Y chromosome analysis. One genetic signature associated with European males was detected in native males throughout North America, but was found at the highest frequency in groups living nearest to Hudson Bay, where trade between Europeans and the region's indigenous peoples was established in the early 17th century.

The new study, along with the earlier genetic and protein studies and the language analyses, is filling a gap in the archaeological record of Athapaskan migration, Malhi said.

This gap is the result of the fact that the Athapaskan migrants seem not to have altered the physical landscape, architecture or cultural practices of the populations they assimilated in the southwest U.S.

The only lasting evidence of the Athapaskan migration found so far is in their language and their genes, Malhi said.

"We're fitting together different lines of evidence," he said. "We're not just using the genetic data. We're using it in combination with the linguistic, oral histories from elders in the community and archaeological data. And even though there has been over a century of archaeological research done in the Southwest, there's not much information there about the Athapaskan migration into the Southwest."

The team also included researchers from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, the University of California at Davis, Washington State University, the University of Montana, the University of Arizona and Trace Genetics.

Adapted from materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.


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NAT: Oklahoma Languages

There are 23 languages still spoken in Oklahoma. At least 14 additional languages are no longer spoken.

Language (Lang. Family), Max. No. of Speakers

Caddo (Caddoan), 20
Cherokee (Iroquoian), 9,000
Cheyenne (Algonkian), 400
Chickasaw (Muskogean), 600
Chiricahua Apache (Na-Dene), 1
Choctaw (Muskogean), 4,000
Comanche (Uto-Aztecan), 100
Yuchi (Isolate), 7
Iowa (Siouan), 30
Kickapoo (Algonkian), 400
Kiowa (Tanoan), 400
Muskogee: Creek and Seminole (Muskogean), 6,000
Osage (Siouan), 1
Otoe (Siouan), 3
Ottawa (Algonkian), 3
Pawnee (Caddoan), 7
Plains Apache (Na-Dene), 3
Ponca (Siouan), 33
Potawatomi (Algonkian), 20
Quapaw (Siouan), 1
Sauk (Algonkian), 7
Shawnee (Algonkian), 200
Wichita (Caddoan), 5

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Monday, July 14, 2008

COM: Theatre overwhelming right now . . .

Sorry for the lack of posting lately, i've been doing three to four rehearsals a day and the load is leaving almost zero time for anything else. I'm in High School Musical which opens this week, and directing I Used to Dream which opens right after HSM closes, and Dragons set to open the first weekend of September.

There are a couple of HUGE theatre months coming -- not only with great classics, but new classics, and brand new, never before seen shows.

First up is Jeff Cunningham's "Book of Ruth" which opens tonight at the Cailloux Theatre in Kerrville. Fresh off their stunning production of "Singin' in the Rain", comes this brand new piece. The show includes a number of ITM theatre program graduates, as well as Dale Green, star of GSQ cofounder Tony Gallucci's newest film, and Jake Asbury, a co-writer/composer of GSQ's next production. Here are their notes on the play: "The Book of Ruth" retells the Old Testament story of a young widow's devotion to her mother-in-law. Set in Texas and later in Tennessee, the play puts a new perspective on familiar tale of love, sacrifice, and acceptance. A Playhouse 2000 production. $15 adults, $5 children under 14. Thursday - Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. 830-896-9393. And here's a Kerrville Daily Times preview -- http://www.dailytimes.com/story.lasso?ewcd=4f2b6f0317c56fc3

The next week, the hugely popular nusical for a new generation "High School Musical" opens at the Point Theatre. Lovingly directed by Melissa May Moncus it features a huge cast of talented young actors from as far away as Austin and San Marcos. "The Voice of GSQ" Charles Bryant appears as Chad, and future GSQ actor Jamin Reither appears in the lead. Their notes: After months of rehearsals, Disney's smash hit, "High School Musical," comes to life July 18 - August 2 on the Hill Country Arts Foundation Point Theatre outdoor stage. The musical, written by Peter Barsocchini, will have nine performances over three weekends at 8:30 p.m. Opening night will feature a post-show reception to meet the cast and crew. For those who are not familiar with "High School Musical," it is the story of a high school basketball star, Troy; and a brainy transfer student, Gabriella, who want to audition for their school's spring musical, but are discouraged by rival peer groups. The play has been described as being part "West Side Story," part "Romeo and Juliet," and part "Grease." According to David Simpatico, who wrote the book for the stage version, the message of "High School Musical," is "you can be whatever you want to be." Director Melissa May-Moncus, a Point Theatre alumnus, has assembled a cast of 31 to perform the difficult score and complicated dance routines. Jamin Reither, who appeared as Curly in "Oklahoma!" last summer, will star as Troy Bolton; and Andrea DeLeon, a recent Tivy High School graduate, will make her Point Theatre debut as Gabriella Montez.Point Theatre interns Jenny Anne Canfield and Bobby Dale Sands will portray siblings Sharpay and Ryan Evans. Charles Bryant, whose last appearance on The Point's outdoor stage was the Prince in "Cinderella," will take on the role of Chad; and Travis Taylor, who recently played one of the sons in "Alone Together," plays Zeke. Taylor will be played by newcomer Jasmin Delacerda. Sunday, July 20 is Family Night at The Point. All tickets will be $5. Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) Services for the deaf and hearing impaired will be available on Saturday, July 26, courtesy of support from the Kerr County United Way. Tickets are selling quickly for this production according to box office staff. For reservations or more information, call the box office at 830-367-5121 or visit the web site at www.hcaf.com. The Point Theatre is located at 120 Point Theatre Road South in Ingram.

Then for one weekend only, August 8-10, there will be a special musical theatre production of an original script "I Used to Dream" put together by Tony Gallucci and the staff and children of the Hill Country Youth Ranch. An hourlong musical "dream" portraying the lives of troubled children ends with hope for their future. Folks who remember the acclaimed "Broken Wings Can Fly" productions at HCYR will feel right at home. In addition to ranch residents, community actors Jake Asbury, Genie Iness, Madison White and Brittney Whitten, and a large crew from Ingram Tom Moore, Our Lady of the Hills and other area theatre programs will be a part of the production. Shows are Friday, August 8 at 7:30, August 9 at 7:30 m and August 10 at 3:00. Tickets are $5 each and can be reserved by calling 830-367-2131.

And GSQ's big announcement is the production of "Dragons", an original musical by Tony Gallucci and Jake Asbury, premiering at the Cailloux Theatre, September 4-21. This show, about a blind girl who learns to "see", is GSQ's first run at an original play. It stars Faith Danielson as Ellen, Ethan Muehlstein as Kevin, Martha Danielson as Margie, Paige Smith as Emily, and Jake Asbury, Jessica Roberts, Genie Iness and Jamin Reither as the parents. Originally written as a short story in 1978, the piece has travelled a long path to its completion with the elegant music composed by Jake Asbury (of recent Cailloux "Singin' in the Rain" acclaim). We are thrilled to have him aboard this journey. Make plans to come see our newest show. More details to come.

Finally, among the other fine shows coming up are Jim Bowman's direction of 'Willy Wonka' at Cailloux, and John Ruth's direction of 'Steel Magnolias" at The Point.

See you at the theatre!

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