Friday, February 20, 2009

NAT: Dying Languages

New atlas shows dying languages around the world

PARIS (AP) - Only one native speaker of Livonian remains on Earth, in Latvia. The Alaskan language Eyak went extinct last year when its last surviving speaker passed away.

Those are just two of the nearly 2,500 languages that UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, says are in danger of becoming extinct or have recently disappeared. That's out of a total of 6,000 world languages.

In a presentation Thursday of a new world atlas of endangered languages, linguists stressed the list is not restricted to small or far-flung countries. They also sought to encourage immigrants to treasure their native languages.

"Language endangerment is a universal phenomenon," said Christopher Moseley, an Australian linguist who edited the atlas' third edition, which is to appear in digital and paper versions.

The atlas says 200 languages have become extinct in the last three generations, and another 199 languages have fewer than 10 speakers left.

More than a fourth of the 192 languages once spoken in the United States have disappeared. Another 71 are severely endangered, according to the atlas.

There is Gros Ventre, spoken by fewer than 10 people in north-central Montana. All are elderly, and none is fully fluent. The last fully fluent speaker died in 1981.

Or Menomonee, spoken in northeast Wisconsin, with just 35 speakers left.

The digital version of the atlas invites users to contribute with updates and allows them to search according to country, degree of endangerment, name of languages or by number of speakers.

Type in Russia, and color-coded flags appear ranging from white (unsafe) _ denoting languages such as Lezgian, spoken in the Caucasus Mountains _ to red (critically endangered), marking those such as the Tundra Enets, spoken in Arctic islands.

Not all is bleak, however. Some endangered languages, like Latvia's Livonian, are being revived by young people and through poetry.

Marleen Habard, editor of the atlas' Andean regions, said indigenous groups in South America have been at the forefront of preserving their regional tongues by pressuring governments to recognize indigenous rights.

Some languages have only recently been discovered. Andoan was not known until a journalist discovered a small group of its speakers on the border between Peru and Ecuador in 2000, Habard said.

Francoise Riviere, deputy director of culture at UNESCO, said raising awareness of the importance of mother tongues is a crucial goal of the project.

"We are trying to teach people that the language of the country from where we come is important, and what counts is being proud of one's own language," she said.

A paper version of the 2009 atlas _ which was funded by Norway and involved a team of over 30 linguists _ will be launched in May.

___

On the Net:

http://www.unesco.org/culture/en/endangeredlanguages


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Wednesday, February 18, 2009

ENV: Ooooooops!!!

Rare Philippines quail spotted - on way to cooking pot

MANILA (AFP) — A rare Philippines quail that was feared to have become extinct has been photographed alive for the first time -- as it was headed for the cooking pot, according to ornithologists.

Hunters snared the Worcester's buttonquail (Turnix worcesteri) in the Caraballo mountain range last month and a TV crew took pictures and video footage of the live bird at a poultry market, the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines said.

Club president Michael Lu said the group was "ecstatic" about the find, but they also "feel sad that the locals do not value the biodiversity around them."

He added: "What if this was the last of its species? Much more has to be done in creating conservation awareness and local consciousness about our unique threatened bird fauna."

Named after Dean Conant Worcester, an American zoologist who worked in the Philippines in the early 20th century, the bird was previously only known through drawings based on dead museum specimens collected decades ago.

"This is a very important finding," said Philippines-based Arne Jensen, a Danish ornithologist who heads the bird club's records committee.

"Once you don't see a bird species in a generation, you start to wonder if it's extinct, and for this bird species we simply do not know its status at all."

The quail's breeding area remains unknown though ornithologists suspect it resides in the high mountain grasslands of the Cordillera mountain range to the west of the Caraballos on the main island of Luzon.

The quail was being sold at a Manila wet market in Manila in 1902 and since then, just a few single specimens have been documented in Nueva Vizcaya and Benguet provinces, which form part of the two mountain ranges, the club said.


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ENV: Kingfisher at work!

One of the coolest nature vids i've ever seen!



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Thursday, February 12, 2009

ATH: Coaching stuff

especially interesting because this is the first i've heard that one of my college roomies was going to be coaching right down the road from me . . . but withdrew . . .


Muehlstein says negativity led to resignation
Alex Byington, The Daily Times, Published February 12, 2009

COMFORT — Less than a year after being hired for his first head coaching job at Comfort High School, Keith Muehlstein again is searching for work.

“The negativity that exists — not everywhere, just in some segments — becomes a cancer to the team, and since you can’t really cut that cancer out, you’ve got to find a way to address it,” Muehlstein said, explaining the reasons for his decision. “So if you can’t fight it, you move on.”

Muehlstein replaced the long-since departed Lee Wiginton, who became the head football coach at Mexia, in February 2008.

This week, Muehlstein resigned from the athletic director/head football spot, along with assistant coaches Kane Harris and Doug Wheeler, and wives Amber Muehlstein and Tiffany Harris. All five taught in the Comfort Independent School District.

Muehlstein talked publicly for the first time since the resignations were unanimously accepted Monday by the Comfort ISD school board despite several community members voicing support for the 32-year-old athletic director.

Muehlstein sought to make his mark in Comfort as a first-year head coach with plans to establish roots in the Hill Country. But with several community members upset with his hiring, issues off the field quickly developed that made it nearly impossible to accomplish that goal.

“There was a segment that was obviously against me, and you either fight it or you move on,” he said. “And it’s hard to fight because next year or the year after, they’re still going to be here.”

Fighting “small town politics” for most of his 11 months on the job, things hit a boiling point this month when Muehlstein felt compelled to explain his decisions regarding the Bobcats football team in a letter published in the Feb. 4 edition of the Comfort News, a weekly Comfort newspaper.

Detailing 11 complaints voiced by several community members in an open-door meeting, Muehlstein defended everything from play calling and use of the spread offense to coaching assignments and players who quit or move away.

“This has taken on a life of its own — it’s not criticism, it’s gotten out of hand,” he said.

Although not the first choice to replace Wiginton, Muehlstein was picked for the Comfort job from several candidates after Smithson Valley assistant coach Brad Lind withdrew three days into his tenure for family reasons.

“When we got here, knowing how young we were, knowing what our schedule looked like early, we knew it was going to be a tough start,” Muehlstein said. “But we knew we were going to get it turned by the end, and we could still get in (to the playoffs), which is what we did.”

Beginning with six straight losses, Muehlstein helped re-energize the Bobcats, fueling them to four straight victories and a spot in the Class 2A-Division I playoffs.

But sending a team to its 10th playoff berth in the last 11 seasons was not enough for parts of the community.

“I really ain’t too worried about what everybody else thinks. I’m going to do what I think is best for the group, period,” Muehlstein said. “... There’s always going to be one mommy or daddy mad. So be it. I don’t care.”

Despite the majority of the criticism coming from a small segment of the population, estimated at around 25 people, their voices were heard loud and clear.

“Sometimes there are others that don’t have that same perspective (as a head coach), they want what’s best for their kid, or whatever other motive they may or may not have,” he added. “So there are always going to be people that disagree.”

Although it was a difficult decision, especially leaving behind so many kids he had built connections with, there was only one option.

“The kids have been great,” Muehlstein said. “And that’s the sad part of all of this ... that they’re the ones that are getting the short end of the stick.”

Now, Muehlstein is moving on, leaving his first head coaching job for an unknown destination.

“What really would have changed? The drama will still be the same drama and why would I subject myself or my family to that?” Muehlstein asked.

Muehlstein’s time at Comfort will fade to black come June. But the soon-to-be father has no doubt there are still plenty of games left in his future.

“The show doesn’t end here, it’s just the end of this chapter,” Muehlstein said.

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OBT: Earlie Williams III

Earlie Williams III

KERRVILLE — Earlie Williams III, age 55, a lifelong resident of Kerrville, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2009, at his residence.

He was born May 22, 1953, in Big Lake, Texas, to Earlie Williams Jr. and Patricia Mae Corner Williams.

Earlie was the owner and operator of Big Earl’s Bar B Que and Solid Gold Night Club in Kerrville. He was a member of the 1968-69 state champion basketball team of Tivy High School. He also was a member of Mt. Olive Baptist Church.

Survivors include his daughters, Vanessa Jeanette Williams of Euless, Patricia Dickerson of Kerrville and Erica Koonce of Norfolk, Va.; sons, Earlie Williams IV and wife, Dora, of Sonora and Shafton Dimery of Kerrville; brothers, Gezetia Williams of San Antonio and Shelly Williams of Kerrville; grandchildren, Iris McAfee, Dekota Morrow, William Van Morris and Carlie Madison Williams.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, at Grimes Funeral Chapels, officiated by Pastor David Schuler, with interment following at Garden of Memories North.

Pallbearers will be Ralph Hardee, Jim Priour, Stuart Caulkins, Edward Uballe, Bobby Pickens, Frankie Enloe, Clifton Leda, Mark Lemeilleur, Mark Cowden, Harold Hardee and Clifton Fifer Jr.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, 8415 Wurzbach, San Antonio, TX 78229.

The family invites you to send condolences at www.grimesfuneralchapels.com by selecting the “Send Condolences” link.

Funeral arrangements are entrusted to Grimes Funeral Chapels of Kerrville.


Local figure Earlie Williams III dies at 55
Conor Harrison, The Daily Times, Published February 12, 2009

Kerrville residents and barbecue lovers across the Hill Country lost a friend Tuesday when Earlie Williams III, owner of Big Earl’s Texas Style Bar B Que and Solid Gold Nightclub passed away at his home in Kerrville. Williams was 55.

Williams was an important member of the 1968-69 Tivy boys basketball team that won back-to-back state championships.

The entire team was inducted into the Tivy Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007.

After graduating from Tivy, Williams had several local businesses, but will be best remembered for his restaurants, including Box Car Willies and Big Earl’s, which opened in the mid-’90s.

Many people around Kerrville will miss his laughter and smiles.

“They will miss partying with him,” said Earlie Williams IV. “Folks are going to miss his everyday positive attitude. He was a rock to his family and a rock to the community.”

Williams worked hard all of his life, something that makes his children very proud.

“My dad enjoyed hard work and wasn’t afraid of it,” Williams said.

The family asks that any donations be made to the American Heart Association.

“The family really does appreciate all of the thoughts and prayers,” Williams added.

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ATH: US 2, Mexico 0

from the National Team Players Association . . .

The United States got a 43rd minute goal from Michael Bradley and another in the 93rd to seal a 2-0 win for the US on Wednesday night in Columbus.

"The first one, DaMarcus served a great ball in and Landon did a great job of heading the ball back across the goal," Bradley said. "Obviously there were a bunch of guys there and the ball bounced to me. On the second goal, Jozy and Landon made a great play to get in behind their defense and Landon cut back as I started to move forward. He played a good ball and I took a shot on target."

Mexico played a man down from the 65th minute when their captain Marquez was sent off for a foul on US keeper Tim Howard. Howard was shown a yellow card for delaying the ensuing restart.

"It was a 50-50 ball and he came in a little bit late and, you know, those kind of things happen in these type of games," Howard said. "I respect him a lot as a player and there are no hard feelings, that's for sure."

"It wasn't the best start and they had a good chance early," US forward Landon Donovan said. "We got a lot more comfortable though and started putting pressure on them. We had a few chances and obviously the goal changed things. In the second half we knew that if we were solid and patient that they would open up and we'd have a chance to get the second."

As for the atmosphere in Columbus on a wet and windy night, US National Team coach Bob Bradley called it "a great atmosphere." "Our fans are really loyal fans, wearing the red, white and blue. That’s something that the players, coaches, everybody appreciates. We know the responsibility that we have for all of them. It’s also important to say that there was a lot of green, red and white in the stadium tonight and I think that also is special. The idea that we still feel like it’s a pro-USA crowd, we feel their passion and support, but at the same time there are Mexican fans, Mexican-Americans who have the passion for their team, it only makes the atmosphere better."
-- GAME REPORT --

Match: United States Men's National Team vs. Mexico
Date: Feb. 11, 2009
Competition: FIFA World Cup Qualifying; Final Round
Venue: Columbus Crew Stadium; Columbus, Ohio
Kickoff: 7 p.m. ET
Attendance: 23,776
Weather: 53 degrees, overcast

Scoring Summary: 1 2 F
USA 1 1 2
MEX 0 0 0

USA – Michael Bradley (unassisted) 43rd minute
USA – Michael Bradley (Landon Donovan) 92+

Lineups:
USA: 1-Tim Howard; 2-Frankie Hejduk, 3-Carlos Bocanegra (capt.), 5-Oguchi Onyewu, 15-Heath Pearce; 8-Clint Dempsey, 4-Michael Bradley, 16-Sacha Kljestan (13-Ricardo Clark, 86), 7-DaMarcus Beasley; 10-Landon Donovan, 11-Brian Ching (9-Jozy Altidore, 83)
Subs not used: 18-Brad Guzan, 6-Jonathan Bornstein, 14-Danny Califf, 17-Jose Francisco Torres, 12-Marvell Wynne
Head Coach: Bob Bradley

MEX: 1-Oswaldo Sanchez; 2-Aaron Galindo, 3-Carlos Salcido, 4-Rafael Marquez (capt.), 5-Ricardo Osorio; 6-Leandro Augusto, 12-Alberto Medina (15-Antonio Naelson, 60), 8-Pavel Pardo; 11-Carlos Ochoa, 10-Nery Castillo (14-Israel Martinez, 34), 17-Giovani dos Santos (9-Omar Bravo, 72)
Subs not used: 13-Guillermo Ochoa, 18-Leobardo Lopez, 7-Luis Perez, 16-Guillermo Franco
Head Coach: Sven-Goran Eriksson

Stats Summary: USA / MEX
Shots: 10 / 9
Shots on Goal: 5 / 3
Saves: 3 / 3
Corner Kicks: 5 / 1
Fouls: 26 / 16
Offside: 4 / 3

Misconduct Summary:
MEX – Rafael Marquez (sent off) 65th minute
USA – Tim Howard (caution) 67

Officials:
Referee: Carlos Batres (GUA)
Assistant Referee 1: Roberto Giron (HON)
Assistant Referee 2: Edwin Gonzalez (GUA)
Fourth Official: Walter Lopez (GUA)


We Need Mexico

By J Hutcherson -- What did we really learn about CONCACAF Qualifying last night. That Mexico better hope they can roll along at home or they risk having to play a CONMEBOL club to be named later to qualify for the World Cup? Maybe. It's easy enough to build up what should have been the strongest opponent in the Hexagonal, but the reality is slightly askew.

With an elite manager, this was a side that had no width in the attack, an under-performing striker, and a defense that was never going to finish ninety minutes without giving up something.

Yes, the United States left themselves open to what could have easily been a goal or two. Unfortunately for Mexico, so did they. The scoreline could have been higher on both sides, with the same three points going in the direction of the States.

Calling for a coaching change will only do so much. Mexico doesn't have the players to put out a side capable of dominating in CONCACAF on their terms. They will have to make game-by-game adjustments, something that almost left them out of the Hexagonal altogether.

Sometimes squads are just a couple of positions and ideas short. Mexico doesn't have a Cuauhtemoc Blanco type player to pick them up and push them forward while the rest of the squad adjusts. Most worrisome of all should have been Marquez pulling what amounts to a Marquez. It's nothing that should have even surprised the El Tri faithful.

Facing the United States in the US and knowing there were no temperature issues, Mexico bunkered in the final third and tried to string passes that were never likely to connect. They played not to lose, the classic hedge that rarely works at any level.

CONCACAF needs Mexico as badly as the US National Team needs them as a foil. Only Azteca remains, and that's got to be enough. Otherwise, we're entering an era for the region that could end up looking a lot like the 1980's. This time it's the US in position instead of Mexico, but it's the same problem. Respect from the rest of the world.


CONCACAF Results: El Salvador Comes Back

By Clemente Lisi - NEW YORK, NY (Feb 12, 2009) USSoccerPlayers -- While the US got off on the right foot and downed Mexico 2-0 on Wednesday night to maintain CONCACAF supremacy, the Hexagonal’s four other teams also did battle. Costa Rica also won to tie the US for first place, cruising past Honduras 2-0, while El Salvador and Trinidad & Tobago battled it out during a scrappy 2-2 tie.

The top three finishers of the round-robin group will automatically advance to the 2010 World Cup, while the fourth-place team will play the fifth-place team from South America in a home-and-away series in November for another berth.

Here is a summary of Wednesday’s games:

Costa Rica 2 – 0 Honduras

Home teams usually have the edge during World Cup qualifying and Costa Rica was no different. Playing before its home fans at Saprissa Stadium in the capital city of San Jose, Costa Rica defeated Honduras with two second-half goals by striker Andy Furtado.

After a scoreless first half, Furtado opened the scoring in the 48th minute by heading a bending free kick from the right by Celso Borges through Honduran goalkeeper Noel Valladares’ legs.

Furtado then struck again 11 minutes later for the Ticos, receiving another ball from the right flank from Armando Alonso and unleashing a blistering shot that left Valladares flummoxed for a second time.

The Costa Ricans continued their unbeaten World Cup qualifying run after storming through the semifinal round last year and finishing with the maximum 18 points from six games against Suriname, El Salvador and Haiti.

El Salvador 2 – 2 Trinidad & Tobago

El Salvador rallied behind Osael Romero’s two goals, both on free kicks, in the final 11 minutes to tie Trinidad & Tobago 2-2 in San Salvador.

Romero scored in the 79th minute off a free kick, then got his second goal in the fourth and final minute of stoppage time to salvage a tie versus the Soca Warriors -- setting off wild celebrations among the 30,000 in the stands at the Estadio Cuscatlan.

Carlos Edwards surprised El Salvador in the seventh minute and Dwight Yorke, who at age 37 is still going strong, added a goal on a penalty kick in the 27th to give the island nation an early lead.

Yorke, who plays for England Premier League club Sunderland, was one of eight British-based players called up by coach Francisco Maturana.

“Ideally, we would have liked to get all three points, but we know these games aren’t easy,” Yorke told reporters afterwards. “We know Central American fans can be very vocal. It was a hostile environment.”

El Salvador recently stumbled through last month’s Central American Nations Cup (eventually won by Panama), opening with a 1-1 tie against Nicaragua, losing 1-0 to Costa Rica in the semifinals and eventually finished in fourth place following a 1-0 defeat to Honduras.

In the next round, slated for March 28, Trinidad, which qualified for the 2006 World Cup, will host Honduras, while El Salvador hosts the United States. On the same day, Costa Rica will travel to Mexico in the third game.


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Tuesday, February 10, 2009

ATH: OLH Season ends, but great season

i'm proud to say that Shane played for me at Tivy and has become an outstanding coach . . .

Hawks come up short in first round

, Published February 10, 2009

After an 0-4 start to the season, Our Lady of the Hills boys soccer coach Shane Heffernan thought he’d be in for a rough first year in TAPPS District 3-Division 3.

But with seven wins in the next eight games, the Hawks (7-8 overall) earned themselves a first-ever spot in the TAPPS playoffs.

“It was a pleasant surprise to say the least,” Heffernan said. “You can’t say enough for how hard they worked. And they’ve gotten a lot of respect in this district in one year.”

But the Hawks’ sensational turnaround came to an end on Saturday when District 1 Champion Irving Highlands shutout visiting OLH 3-0 in their opening regional playoff game.

“We were in this game, but the referees killed us,” Heffernan said. “I hate to say that, but two of the goals were the referees’ faults. One came of a penalty kick that shouldn’t have been, and the other one a guy was way offsides and they didn’t even call it.”

Highlands scored first in the 22nd minute and then again right before halftime to take a 2-0 lead. They would add their final goal late in the contest.

Junior goalie J.D. Salinas had nine saves

Despite the loss, Heffernan said the season as a whole was still a success.

“They exceeded my expectations for sure,” Heffernan said.

With the team’s two leading scorers — junior Spencer Brown and sophomore Dalton Fierst — expected to return next season, along with Salinas in goal, the Hawks have high expectations for their second year in District 3.

“I think we’re either district champion or runner-up [next year] because the teams that played really well this year are losing lots of players and we’re losing one,” Heffernan said. “And a couple of kids that will be coming in to play for us are strong players.

“... I think we’re poised to make a really good run next year,” he added.

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Monday, February 09, 2009

THE: Last week for The Lion in Winter

The Guadalupe Stage Quartet’s newest production, that of James Goldman’s The Lion in Winter, is in its final week at Warrior Theatre in Ingram. The show is directed by Marie Cearley, a GSQ founder, assisted by Justin Shotts, and is produced by GSQ founder Holly Riedel.

Appearing as Queen Eleanor is Holly Riedel, Tony Gallucci is King Henry II, Richard the Lionhearted is played by Irec Hargrove, Prince Geoffrey by Chris McCrae, and Brian Ross is Prince John. The mistress Princess Alais Capet is played by Prari Blair, and her brother King Philip of France is played by Matt Poole.

Henry III, heir to the throne of England has died over the summer, and the rest of the family gathers for the holiday, each plotting to take, inherit, regain or usurp the crown. King Henry II’s wife, Queen Eleanor returns from her dungeoning up to spar with the king’s mistress, Princess Alais, brother to the King of France.

The French king, himself a teenager and newly crowned, but wise beyond his years shows up to demand a marriage or retake his father’s dowry. Meanwhile the three royal sons, Richard the Lionhearted, Geoffrey and John, run the family ragged by making insidious alliances and bargains. Who then ends up with the crown? Who ends up with the land? And who, pray tell, ends up with the young princess? There’s only one way to find out.

The Guadalupe Stage Quartet was formed in 2006 to present fine dramatic performances in area theatres, and was the brainchild of founder Roy Burney, who died before the first production could be mounted. “The Lion in Winter” was one of his finest moments on stage. The remaining members of the “Quartet”, Riedel, Cearley and Gallucci, have dedicated all their performances to his memory. One hundred percent of the proceeds from the show go to funding ITM Thespian educational experiences and a scholarship in Burney’s name which is given annually to a senior Thespian.

Shows are Thursday through Saturday February 12-14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door, and group rates are available by calling 830-377-8957.

The theatre is located next to the Ingram ISD Administration building at 510 College Street. Stay right (north) on Tx 27 at the Y in Ingram at Moore Lumber. At the next light, at College Street, turn left. The theatre is on a hill on your right a couple of blocks down College.


Photo by John Dean Domingue – King Henry II (Tony Gallucci) and Richard the Lionhearted (Irec Hargrove) spar over who’s to be the next king of England in a scene from the Guadalupe Stage Quartet’s “The Lion in Winter”



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ATH: U.S. National Team Roster

US National Team coach Bob Bradley announced his 20-man roster for Wednesday's World Cup Qualifier. To no one's surprise, over half the squad is made up of players from foreign clubs. Eighteen of the players have appeared in World Cup qualifying for 2010.

US ROSTER BY POSITION
GOALKEEPERS (2): Brad Guzan (Aston Villa: 4/3 SO), Tim Howard (Everton FC: 7/5 SO)
DEFENDERS (7): Carlos Bocanegra (Rennes: 16/2), Jonathan Bornstein (Chivas USA, 1/0), Danny Califf (FC Midtjylland: 3/0), Frankie Hejduk (Columbus Crew: 14/1), Oguchi Onyewu (Standard de Liege: 12/1), Heath Pearce (Hansa Rostock: 7/0), Marvell Wynne (Toronto FC: 0/0)
MIDFIELDERS (6): DaMarcus Beasley (Glasgow Rangers: 21/6), Michael Bradley (Borussia Mönchengladbach: 6/2), Ricardo Clark (Houston Dynamo: 3/0), Sacha Kljestan (Chivas USA: 6/0), Robbie Rogers (Columbus Crew: 0/0), José Francisco Torres (Pachuca: 1/0)
FORWARDS (5): Jozy Altidore (Xerez C.D.: 3/1), Brian Ching (Houston Dynamo: 12/6), Charlie Davies (Hammarby IF: 1/1) Clint Dempsey (Fulham FC: 12/4), Landon Donovan (Bayern Munich: 25/9)


*numbers indicate all-time World Cup Qualifying caps/goals


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Friday, February 06, 2009

LNX: Miscellaneous cool links

from Clicked and a few other places:

someone found a piece of driftwood and is selling it on eBay, check the starting bid:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&item=150324400773

a little hardcore religion thing:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29049101/


define yourself in five brands:
http://5brand.tumblr.com/

somehow i think it's cool that the world was one species richer for seven minutes:
http://ecoworldly.com/2009/02/01/extinct-ibex-resurrected-by-cloning-then-dies/



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Thursday, February 05, 2009

THE: GSQ's The Lion in Winter week two

It’s week two coming up for the Guadalupe Stage Quartet’s new production of James Goldman’s “The Lion in Winter” at Warrior Theatre in Ingram. The show is directed by Marie Cearley, a GSQ founder, assisted by Justin Shotts, and is produced by GSQ founder Holly Riedel.

Appearing as Queen Eleanor is Holly Riedel, Tony Gallucci is Henry II, Richard is played by Irec Hargrove, Geoffrey by Chris McCrae, and Brian Ross is John. The mistress Princess Alais is played by Prari Blair, and her brother King Philip of France is played by Matt Poole. Madelyn Beadouin is the stage manager for this show.

Henry III, heir to the throne of England has died over the summer, and the rest of the family gathers for the holiday, each plotting to take, inherit, regain or usurp the crown. King Henry II’s wife, Queen Eleanor returns from her dungeoning up to spar with the king’s mistress, Princess Alais, brother to the King of France.

The French king, himself a teenager and newly crowned, but wise beyond his years shows up to demand a marriage or retake his father’s dowry. And the three royal sons, Richard the Lionhearted, Geoffrey and John, run the family ragged by making insidious alliances and bargains. Who then ends up with the crown? Who ends up with the land? And who, pray tell, ends up with the young princess? There’s only one way to find out.

The Guadalupe Stage Quartet was formed in 2006 to present fine dramatic performances in area theatres, and was the brainchild of founder Roy Burney, who died before the first production could be mounted. “The Lion in Winter” was one of his finest moments on stage. The remaining members of the “Quartet”, Riedel, Cearley and Gallucci, have dedicated all their performances to his memory. One hundred percent of the proceeds from the show go to funding ITM Thespian educational experiences and a scholarship in Burney’s name which is given annually to a senior Thespian.

Shows are Thursday through Saturday, February 5-7 at 7:30 p.m., a Sunday matinee at 2:00 p.m. on February 8, and Thursday through Saturday, February 12-14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door, and group rates are available by calling 830-377-8957.

The theatre is located next to the Ingram ISD Administration building at 510 College Street. Stay right (north) on Tx 27 at the Y in Ingram at Moore Lumber. At the next light, at College Street, turn left. The theatre is on a hill on your right a couple of blocks down College.


Photo by John Dean Domingue: Brian Ross, Prari Blair, Tony Gallucci and Holly Riedel rehearse a scene from The Lion in Winter at Warrior Theatre.


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NAT: Facebook screws up

Facebook is beginning to remind me of Coca-Cola, too big to be sensitive to the people who keep them in business . . . FB got that way when they changed over to the new design, at that moment they had to shift into the F*** Them, we know what's best for them mode, and things have gone downhill since . . . and to quote my newest role, "there's no sense asking if the air's any good, when there's nothing else to breathe." So what're you gonna do? . . . this article doesn't even mention how it deals with multiple or compound first or last names either which is pretty insulting at its core also . . .


Facebook no friend to American Indian names

By Associated Press

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A 28-year-old computer technician from South Dakota found out that the Facebook social networking site had a real problem with her last name.

In the middle of planning a trip, Robin Kills the Enemy saw that Facebook deactivated her site, telling her that "fake names" violate the terms of use.

After back-and-forth e-mails, she had to send a scan of a government identification document to prove her real last name is Kills The Enemy.

In the meantime, Nebraska journalism student Nancy Kelsey wrote a news story about Kills The Enemy's issues with Facebook. She also started a Facebook group called "Facebook: don't discriminate against Native surnames!!!"

More than 1,000 users joined the cause in only a few days. Kelsey says she hopes the group will spur interest in the matter.

Facebook user Will White Eyes of Pine Ridge says he thinks Facebook had no general knowledge of Native Americans or their surnames.

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NAT: Passamaquoody Dictionary

Massive Passamaquoddy-Maliseet dictionary holds Algonquin culture
By Gale Courey Toensing, Story Published: Feb 4, 2009

INDIAN TOWNSHIP, Maine – After three decades of work, a group of native speakers, educators and linguists have produced an Algonquian language dictionary unequalled in size, scope and depth.

Published by the University of Maine Press, the “Passamaquoddy-Maliseet Dictionary/Peskotomuhkati Wolastoqewi Latuwewakon” made its debut in early December. The volume is more than 1,200 pages long and includes 18,000 entries.

David A. Francis, a Passamaquoddy elder, and Robert M. Leavitt, professor emeritus of education at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick where he was director of the Mi’kmaq-Maliseet Institute for 14 years, are listed as authors with Margaret Apt, Passamaquoddy community research coordinator and Passamaquoddy language teacher at a high school in Eastport.

For Passamaquoddy educator Wayne Mitchell, the publication of the dictionary culminates more than three decades of effort to restore and preserve the Passamaquoddy language he learned and spoke as a child growing up at Sipayik, one of the two Passamaquoddy communities in coastal Maine.

“For more than half a century many individuals, including myself, have been committed to making sure that the next generation has the tools and methodology essential to their own creativity in future endeavors. This dictionary stands as the centerpiece of our commitment,” said Wayne Newell, director of Native Language and Cultural Services and Indian Township School, in the dictionary’s introduction.

Until the 1950’s, everyone in the Passamaquoddy communities at Sipayik and Indian Township spoke Passamaquoddy. The communities were isolated and people had little contact with non-Indians.

“The older folks knew how to communicate in English because they had to go to Eastport and places to shop. But Passamaquoddy was their primary language,” Newell said. “Even in my grandmother’s house, she didn’t want English spoken there – she thought it was silly.”

With the advent of electricity, television and new roads running through the tribe’s land in the late 1950s, the tribal communities opened up to the larger world, and Passamaquoddy, like indigenous languages elsewhere, started to fade into oblivion under social and economic pressures, assimilationist educational policies, and the irresistible pull of mass media.

At Indian Township where Newell taught, he began efforts to retain, restore and preserve the language his coastal ancestors had developed and spoken over thousands of years – the vehicle that expresses and holds a people’s culture.

“This dictionary project actually started here,” Newell said. “I had a little bit of money from a grant and one of the things I wanted to do was someday have a dictionary published so one thing led to another.”

Newell and Leavitt were students together at Harvard University, graduating in 1971. Soon after, Newell hired Leavitt to work at Indian Township to help develop teaching materials using federal grant funds.

A Harvard linguist had set up a writing system for the language project. Newell asked for and received permission to modify it “because one of my dreams was to teach a writing system because I really believe that the only way a language is going to survive is if we have a writing system of some sort.”

Other linguists and scholars got involved – the late Dr. Kenneth Hale of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where Newell also studied and met Phil LeSourd, who published the first Passamaquoddy dictionary of 3,000 entries.

Newell also hired Francis, a tribal elder who is now 91 years old, to work at the Indian Township school.

“Robert and David took in all of what had already happened and kind of took off with it and they kept working over the years. Margaret Apt came in somewhere in the early 90s and they kept getting little grants,” Newell said.

A language editorial committee was formed to oversee the work.

“So everybody has been working together over the years, and last summer we knew we were done, and we actually got a publisher and it’s really neat because the University of Maine Press is the publisher and I think that’s appropriate,” Newell said.

The most challenging part of the work was deciding what to include.

Passamaquoddy is an inflected verb-based-language that has nouns, pronouns, particles and other parts of speech added as prefixes to the verb to denote time, place, person, plurals, action and other elements. Entire sentences or thoughts, therefore, can be contained in a single word, making an infinite number of options for dictionary-makers to choose from.

The language has a past, present and future tense and an absentative tense that is expressed through tone to indicate if something is absent or if someone has died.

“And also we have words that can move objects around whether they’re here or over there or out of the room. Just by the way we use those words you know where the object or person is that you’re talking about. That’s why the Algonquin language is so very fascinating to linguists – it’s because of the structure – and they come here all the time to study it,” Newell said.

Leavitt, who is traveling in Mexico, could not be reached for comment, but other tribal members lent their voices to the production.

Imelda Perley, a Maliseet speaker and educator in New Brunswick across the St. Croix River from Passamaquoddy, and her husband David wrote in a preface, “In our view, the dictionary represents a Sacred bundle containing ancestral teachings, values, beliefs, and worldviews. The dictionary also symbolizes a ‘language bank’ complete with savings, investments, and assets for present and future generations.”

The Perleys thank Francis and Leavitt for “their labor of love for the language.”

“Their masterpiece has just saved another language from extinction. All we need now are the carriers of the language!” they wrote.

That’s the real challenge, Newell said. The tribe has between 100-150 native speakers, but a new generation of speakers is needed. Passamaquoddy is taught in the school, but students are not really fluently bilingual.

“It’s one of my biggest frustrations. I say in the introduction that this dictionary is not going to save the language, but a commitment by the community will.”

The key is using it in public places and common everyday conversation. That’s why the dictionary is so important, Newell said.

“If you read the introduction you’ll see that it’s actually much more than a dictionary; it’s actually a teaching tool for the language itself. We tried to design it that way,” he said.

Even big tribes with thousands of native speakers share the problem of rapid language extinction.

“The government system actually tried to take our languages away and unless we turn this tide pretty quickly, they will have succeeded,” Newell said.

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