Wednesday, June 30, 2010

The Daily Soccer

based more on the draw, sentiment and longtime faves than strength, my final four picks are: Netherlands, Spain, Germany and Ghana

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Monday, June 28, 2010

The Daily Soccer

ORANJE!!!

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COM: Some Comeuppance

From the Austin Chronicle

Creationists Get Schooled in Court
BY LEE NICHOLS

A group of Texas religious fundamentalists has lost yet another battle in its war against science and managed to piss off a judge in the process. On June 18, U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks dismissed a request for summary judgment by the Dallas-based Institute for Creation Research in its suit against the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The ICR sought to offer a master's degree in science education from "a Biblical scientific creationist viewpoint," which the coordinating board refused to recognize as legitimate. ICR sued on the grounds that its First and 14th Amendment rights to free speech, free exercise, equal protection, and due process were violated. Sparks said ICR's claims were not obvious enough for summary judgment, and not only that, but the complaint was so ridiculously worded that it was difficult to understand. In his decision, Sparks wrote, "It appears that although the Court has twice required Plaintiff to re-plead and set forth a short and plain statement of the relief requested, Plaintiff is entirely unable to file a complaint which is not overly verbose, disjointed, incoherent, maundering, and full of irrelevant information."

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Saturday, June 26, 2010

The Daily Soccer

well . . . Congrats to Ghana, well played, well deserved, two fantastic goals . . . and thanks over and over to the US for the world class effort . . .

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The Daily Soccer

USA!! . . . . won't be able to live blog this one, but i'll be taking notes and there'll be plenty to say afterwards . . . i hope

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Friday, June 25, 2010

The Daily Soccer

the colonies vs. the empires!

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Thursday, June 24, 2010

The Daily Soccer

coolest part begins around 3:25 . . . http://ping.fm/TXdJe

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The Daily Soccer

http://ping.fm/g02pH

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The Daily Soccer

lordy, Netherlands and Japan!!! gotta love the finishes . . .

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The Daily Soccer

JAPAN AGAIN!!!!!

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The Daily Soccer

rebound off blocked penalty for Denmark! 1-2 . . . with minutes to go!

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The Daily Soccer

Cameroon too! in the final minutes . . . 1-2 also . . . it's that American game plan!

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The Daily Soccer

Cameroon!! Oh No!!

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The Daily Soccer

Half, 1-0 Netherlands, 2-0 Japan!

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The Daily Soccer

L'ORANJE!!!!! the ghost of Cruyff and Michels!!!! 1-0 . . . and the Danes better study some US-Slovenia film at the half

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The Daily Soccer

and on another set play . . . something new every day . . .

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The Daily Soccer

JAPAN!!!!! Something is rotten for . . . well you saw that coming . . . i am beginning to think there is some kind of euroissue going on

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The Daily Soccer

only second free kick goal of the cup so far?? not sure, but i think so . . .

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The Daily Soccer

may be the first world cup ever where no favorites make the final . . .

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The Daily Soccer

p.s. Go L'Oranje!

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The Daily Soccer

Japan!!!!!

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The Daily Soccer

Adieu, Ciao: First time ever both finalists from previous World Cup fail to reach round of 16

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The Daily Silliness

gotta love automated response systems: email from Classmates.com "New Class Alum! Remember Ben Dover from Spring Branch High School?

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The Daily Soccer

i looooove this cup . . . your local American pals griping about low scores and ties are simply clueless . . .

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The Daily Soccer

there was a moment there when the Italians set aside their grumpy style and looked like yankees . . .

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The Daily Soccer

Final 0-0 in the other, Paraguay goes on, but the Nix have mucho to be proud of - looks to be exciting soccer from the down unders next time

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The Daily Soccer

That's it 3-2, record for extra time, Italy going home . . . ! ! ! ! ! !

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The Daily Soccer

O SOLE MIO!!!! Goal-Italy -- offside callback -- Goal-Slovakia -- Goal-Italy -- now 3-2!!!! and into injury time . . .

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The Daily Soccer

@ESPN: the defending champs who have been sent home after the first round are: Italy in 1950, Brazil in 1966 and France in 2002

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The Daily Soccer

. . . and if not, they go home, BUT, if they do, they win the group?! deja vu all over again . . .

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The Daily Soccer

this is crazy . . . New Zealand, who i was bragging on this morning, doesn't exactly look like it might beat Paraguay at this point . . .

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The Daily Soccer

holy crap, Italy going home?? will be first time out in first round since 1974!!

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The Daily Soccer

SLOVAKIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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The Daily Soccer

ha! shoutout to Jessica, 1-0 Slovakia over Italy at half, New Zealand-Paraguay tied at 0 . . . this is the most complicated group of all

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The Daily Soccer

my passion of heritage is hiding behind disgust for the brutal, melodramatic, destructive style Italy seems compelled to foist on the game

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The Daily Soccer

which is to say . . . right now i'm feeling a little gloaty for Slovakia . . .

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The Daily Soccer

musing on Oceania having a pretty sweet cup so far, even if they go home . . .

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Wednesday, June 23, 2010

The Daily Soccer

http://ping.fm/SPfba

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The Daily Soccer

Ozil returns!

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The Daily Soccer

winding down, feel like both Slovenia and Algeria were worthy of advancing too, unlike some other pretenders including, ahem, some big names

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The Daily Soccer

http://ping.fm/hgkNA

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The Daily Soccer

can't hardly get a tweet in edgewise . . .

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The Daily Soccer

loads of credit to M'Bolhi!

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The Daily Soccer

absolutely insane - do you realize we were seconds, SECONDS, from elimination, but we ended up winning not only the game, but the group?!

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The Daily Soccer

somehow there is a sublime beauty in Donovan being the savior . . .

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The Daily Soccer

New York Times: Unbelievable denouement in Pretoria!

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The Daily Soccer

i was prepping my little blog about how proud i was of the guys anyway . . . hohoho . . .

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The Daily Soccer

i need a heart surgeon . . .

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The Daily Soccer

IMPOSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSIBLLLLLLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEE

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The Daily Soccer

my fingers are numb . . .

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The Daily Soccer

wow, really limp cup for Rooney eh?

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The Daily Soccer

cardiac arrest . . . . . . . .

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The Daily Soccer

the best news is that we gave up nothing . . . really, really good news in fact . . . the bad news? . . . well you know . . .

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The Daily Soccer

England with even more incentive for us to pick it up . . .

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The Daily Soccer

oooohhhhhh nooooooo mr. billllllll . . . . .

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The Daily Soccer

our usual little bit shaky to start . . .

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The Daily Soccer

Onyewu not starting!

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The Daily Soccer

okay boys . . . let's go to work: we can hardly argue we belong in the tournament if we can't win a game in the group . . . time to man up

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COM: Fine Honor for a Fine Lady

excerpt from today's paper:

http://www.dailytimes.com/story.lasso?ewcd=cef91a8d7bd1f470


Five of Kerrville’s most treasured citizens were honored Monday night at the Dietert Center during the fourth annual Life’s Treasures award ceremony co-sponsored by Dietert and The Times.

Nell Lenard, Phil Scharnhorst, Leatrice Nixon and Warren and Judy Ferguson all were honored and given plaques in recognition of their outstanding community service.

. . .


Leatrice Nixon spends her time volunteering with a number of places around town, including Peterson Hospice, Playhouse 2000, Kerrville Performing Arts Society and The Point Theater.

“I am overwhelmed,” Nixon said upon receiving her award. “I can’t believe I’m standing here. I’ve always thought it was more blessed to give than to receive. Thank you so much.”



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ATH: Starting lineup

Altidore fit to start apparently . . . Onyewu out of the lineup!

Howard
Cherundolo-DeMerit-Bocanegra(c)-Bornstein
Donovan-Bradley-Edu-Dempsey
Altidore-Gomez


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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

The Daily Soccer

SOUTH AFRICA!!!! OMG, France will never live this cup down . . .

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ENV: Trip List 20 June 2010

20 June 2010 trip to survey odonates and for filming at Cook’s Slough, Tom Nunn Crossing, Concan, Big Springs Ranch, South Fork Marsh, Rio Vista Crossing, HCYR

Codes
C= TX: Uvalde Co., Cook’s Slough Nature Park
T=TX: Uvalde CO., Tom Nunn Crossing on the Nueces River
B=TX: Real Co., Big Springs Ranch
S=TX: Kerr Co., South Fork Marsh
R=TX: Kerr Co., Rio Vista Crossing on TX39
H=TX: Kerr Co., Hill Country Youth Ranch
K=TX: Kerr Co., West Kerr County roads on TX27, TX39 & TX41


American Rubyspot T-4, B-30, R-10 (photos)
Smoky Rubyspot R-12
Blue-fronted Dancer C-2 (film, photos)
Violet Dancer B-15
Kiowa Dancer T-2, B-60, R-1 (photos)
Powdered Dancer R-40
Aztec Dancer B-3 (photos)
Springwater Dancer B-1 (photos)
Blue-ringed Dancer C-3, B-30, R-2
Dusky Dancer T-100, B-200, R-100
Double-striped Bluet B-10
Stream Bluet B-15 (photos)
Arroyo Bluet B-1
Orange Bluet H-2
Citrine Forktail H-8
Rambur’s Forktail C-2
Desert Firetail H-20
Eastern Ringtail T-2, B-1, R-1
Pronghorn Clubtail T-1
Sulphur-tipped Clubtail C-3, T-1
Dragonhunter T-1
Four-striped Leaftail C-2, T-4, B-2 (film, photos)
Five-striped Leaftail C-1, B-1 (photos)
Narrow-striped Forceptail C-1
Dot-winged Baskettail H-1
Prince Baskettail C-1, H-1
Red-tailed Pennant C-1 (film, photos)
Four-spotted Pennant C-4 (film)
Gray-waisted Skimmer T-2 LL (film)
Halloween Pennant T-1
Checkered Setwing C-1, T-6 B-3 (photos)
Black Setwing C-8, T-8, B-2 (film, photos)
Swift Setwing C-2, B-3
Pin-tailed Pondhawk C-1, T-1
Eastern Pondhawk C-20, T-30, B-12, S-1 (photos)
Comanche Skimmer B-18, S-1, H-2 (photos – f ovipositing, m-perched at B)
Widow Skimmer C-3, T-3, B-2, S-1, R-1, H-1
Jade-striped Sylph B-1
Roseate Skimmer C-6, T-1, B-1 (film, photos)
Blue Dasher C-40, T-3, H-1
Slough Amberwing C-3
Eastern Amberwing C-12, T-2 (film, photos)
Common Whitetail C-6
Filigree Skimmer T-1
saddlebags sp. T-2
Black Saddlebags C-4
Red Saddlebags C-3

Sad Underwing C-1 (film, photos)

Black Swallowtail C-4 T-4
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail C-1b
Giant Swallowtail C-2 T-1
Pipevine Swallowtail C-3 T-2 B-2
Dainty Sulphur B-1
Sleepy Orange C-20 T-4
Lyside Sulphur C-9 T-4 B-2
Cloudless Sulphur C-2
Large Orange Sulphur C-1
Fatal Metalmark C-1 (film, photos)
American Snout T-1
Phaon Crescent C-40 B-3 S-1
Bordered Patch C-30 T-12
American Lady B-2
Goatweed Leafwing T-1 (film, photos)
Tawny Emperor C-2 (film)
Empress Antonia C-1 H-1
Gulf Fritillary C-3 T-2 B-1
Common Buckeye C-1
Common Mestra C-2 T-1 B-1
Viceroy C-1
Queen C-5 (film, photos)
Monarch C-2 T-1
Common/White Checkered-Skipper C-8
Funereal Duskywing T-1
Horace’s Duskywing T-1
Common Sootywing C-12
Fiery Skipper C-1

Red Harvester Ant C-+ B-+

Orange Grasshopper (film)
Gray Bird Grasshopper C-1
small grasshopper sp. C-1000
Central Texas Leaf Katydid C-20 T-8 B-4

Smallish Orb Weaver C-3 (film)

Asian Clam C-1

Guadalupe Bass B-4 (photos)
Blacktail Shiner B-100

Blanchard’s Cricket Frog T-4 B-20 S-10
Rio Grande Leopard Frog C-3 B-12
Bullfrog C-1

Spotted Whiptail C-15
Blotched Watersnake B-1
Red-eared Slider C-6 (film, photos)

Great Blue Heron S-1
Green Heron C-1
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck C-3 (film, photos)
Turkey Vulture C-20 T-3 B-12
Black Vulture C-4 T-2 B-2
Red-tailed Hawk B-1
Wild Turkey K-40
Killdeer C-1
Common Nighthawk H-1
Rock Pigeon +
Mourning Dove C-10
White-winged Dove C-30
Greater Roadrunner C-1
Chimney Swift B-1
Black-chinned Hummingbird C-4 B-2
Green Kingfisher T-1
Ladder-backed Woodpecker C-1 S-1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker S-1
Black Phoebe T-1 B-1
Eastern Phoebe B-1
Ash-throated Flycatcher C-2
Great Kiskadee C-2
Western Kingbird K-1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher K-3
Bell’s Vireo C-20
White-eyed Vireo S-1
Green Jay C-3
Blue Jay H-1
Common Raven K-4
Cliff Swallow B-200 (film, photos – gathering mud for nests, building on cliff)
Canyon Wren B-1
Carolina Wren B-2
Bewick’s Wren B-1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher B-5 (feeding fledglings)
Northern Mockingbird C-2 K-2 H-1
Yellow-throated Warbler B-2
Yellow-breasted Chat T-3
Summer Tanager H-1
Painted Bunting C-8
Northern Cardinal C-10 B-4
Pyrrhuloxia C-1
Chipping Sparrow B-1
Field Sparrow B-2
Cassin’s Sparrow C-2 T-1
Lesser Goldfinch C-6 T-2 B-2 H-2
Brown-headed Cowbird B-2
Great-tailed Grackle +
House Sparrow +

Fallow Deer K-1
Blackbuck K-20
Red Lechwe K-2
Elk K-2
White-tailed Deer K-30






Cliff Swallows collecting mud at Big Springs Ranch, Real Co.



Comanche Skimmer, Libellua comanche, male, perched
TX: Real Co, Big Springs Ranch





Comanche Skimmer, Libellua comanche, female, ovipositing
TX: Real Co, Big Springs Ranch



Stream Bluet, Enallagma exsulans
TX: Real Co., Big Springs Ranch


Five-striped Leaftail, Phyllogomphoides albrighti
TX: Real Co., Big Springs Ranch




Red-tailed Pennant, Brachymesia furcata
TX: Uvalde Co., Cook's Slough




Sad Underwing, Catocala maestosa
TX: Uvalde Co., Cook's Slough




Roseate Skimmer, Orthemis ferruginea
TX: Uvalde Co., Cook's Slough



Eastern Amberwing, Perithemis tenera
TX: Uvalde Co., Cook's Slough


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World Music New Wire #11

Cape Verdean Swing and Red-Hot Sodade: Carmen Souza Savors Trans-Atlantic Ties on Protegid

Photobucket


Carmen_cPatriciaPascal

Carmen Souza’s voice purrs like kernels of corn swirling on a traditional wooden platter one moment and bursts with a perfect blue note the next. It rings like a red-hot solo and sighs like a ship-deck lament. It finds the sweet spot between Birdland and the white sands of Cape Verde, the archipelago far off the coast of West Africa.

Protegid, the London-based musician and songwriter’s latest album, lives in this magical Trans-Atlantic space, thoughtfully exploring the unexpected connections between jazz and Cape Verdean culture. Virtuosic yet warm, stunning and welcoming, Souza, with support from long-time musical collaborator Theo Pas’cal, captures all the possibilities of her Cape Verdean roots, everything from Polish dances to Arabic ornaments, with earthy wisdom and cerebral swing.

Carmen_Cover Souza has long embraced these roots, the music she grew up hearing her sailor father play on the guitar, the rhythms of language and daily life in a Cape Verdean family. But it wasn’t until she was already studying translation at a university in Lisbon that she discovered the sounds that would forge her voice: the music of jazz greats, from singers like Ella Fitzgerald, who use their voices as instruments, to soloists like Bill Evans, Miles Davis, and, most symbolically, Horace Silver.

Silver points to the intriguing, yet rarely explored connection between American jazz and Cape Verdean music, something Souza felt almost immediately. Silver, whose classic “Song for My Father” gets a new twist thanks to Souza’s Creole lyrics and gorgeous voice, had Cape Verdean ancestry, yet the ties run far deeper.

“Cape Verde was colonized by Portugal, but a lot of other European, African, and Arabic influences came afterward. It’s a mestizo culture,” Souza reflects. “I came to discover that the songs that people sang in the fields on Cape Verde have the same pentatonic scale identified with the blues,” in part due to a shared history of slavery.

This trans-Atlantic link makes Souza’s sway from one idiom to the other effortless. “Magia ca tem” starts out as a morna, the traditional bittersweet song form made famous by Cesaria Evora, yet soon morphs into a full-on jazz swing. “Someone who doesn’t know much about my Cape Verdean roots will most likely identify this morna as a jazz standard,” Souza smiles. “I love that. I love to put things together.”

There’s another element binding blues to Cape Verde’s shores called sodade, a deep and sorrowful longing for home, for the kind of sanctuary Souza’s lyrics often invoke on Protegid. It echoes in the song of the same name, originally recorded by Evora but reimagined by Souza with help from Cuban pianist Victor Zamora.

“’Sodade’ has a great history behind it,” say Souza. “A man was abducted from Cape Verde, taken from his family to work in San Tome, in the fields. While he was on the ship, he wrote these words longing for Cape Verde and his loved ones. It’s a simple story, just a man suffering in this boat. But this song”—like the many, many migrants forced to leave Cape Verde for economic reasons—“went all over the world.”

Souza got her own taste of sodade as a young girl, as her father often left home for months at a time. “My father was traveling everywhere. He worked on cargo ships, common work for Cape Verdean men,” Souza recalls. “I felt this Cape Verdean feeling of sodade quite near me, from early on.”

At the same time, Souza gained great strength from her upbringing and her roots, the protection, both familial and spiritual, reflected in the title track, “Protegid, which means “Protected” in English” And this strength continues to flow, whether she’s uncovering unexpected gems of Cape Verdean wisdom on the internet or exploring unexpected sides of the islands’ wildly multifaceted culture.



“Dos Eternidade” was sparked by an online video Souza came across that featured a Cape Verdean elder speaking his mind. “A video I saw on YouTube had a very wise old man talking about modern society,” Souza remembers. “He was talking about humanity being very focused on material rather than spiritual things, and that there are two eternities: being good and being bad.” These thoughts stayed with Souza as she and Pas’cal were playing with a bass line one day. Intuitively, the close collaborators felt a melody and the lyrics, drawing on the old man’s words, followed naturally.

Souza was inspired by other aspects of Cape Verde’s diverse cultures, where one rhythm that’s well loved but often neglected is the mazurka, which forms the foundation for “M’sta Li Ma Bo.”

Along with Poles and their dances, Cape Verde has long incorporated Arabic influences, on top of its African and European flavors. Souza draws on the sounds of the oud (Arabic lute) and keening vocal ornamentation for the heart-wrenching “Mara Marga,” the frightening tale of a neglected toddler and a powerful indictment of child abuse.

“It’s about how it sounds, but it was also the emotion of the musicians involved and what Adel Salameh, the oud player, and singer Naziha Azzouz could give to the song,” Souza explains. “It’s not very logical, but it’s a very profound thing.”

That profound intuition guided Souza and Pas’cal as they traveled with a portable studio, recording tracks with friends in hotel rooms and borrowed spaces around North America and Europe. Yet everywhere, the duo strove for the intimacy and immediacy of an artful jazz solo. Or of a perfect batch of cachupa.

“Cachupa is a traditional dish that uses dried corn,” Souza explains, “and to choose the corn, women on Cape Verde go through what’s called tente midj. They put the corn on a wooden plate and stir it to a certain rhythm as they sort the kernels. I used to watch my mother do this, and that rhythm begins my song ‘Tente Midj.’ It’s about stirring up your life, not getting too comfortable, staying engaged.”

“Carmen Souza sings in her native creole dialect with an intimacy, sensuality, and vivacity, characterised by a tremendous lightness of touch. Her music has a deceptive simplicity, a rare clarity, derived from a unique mix of influences from her Cape Verdean background to jazz and modern soul creating this beautifully vibrant, largely acoustic, accessible hybrid. World soul music for the 21st century.”— David Sylvian, UK singer-songwriter

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ATH: Scouting Report -- Algeria

From the US National Team Players Association

Scouting Report: Algeria

By Clemente Lisi

Win and they’re in the final 16. For the never-say-die USA, it’s that simple. Standing in the way is Algeria, a team that has played inconsistently at this World Cup.

While the US is coming off a hard-fought 2-2 draw last Friday against Slovenia, Algeria also put on a strong showing in its scoreless tie against England the same day. The results put the USA’s destiny in its own hands, with a victory Wednesday at Loftus Versfeld Stadium in Pretoria advancing the United States out of Group C.

“We’re going into our third game. We have no choice but to win,” Landon Donovan said after the Slovenia game.

The US is currently in second place with four points after a much-debated, controversial call by referee Koman Colibaly of Mali who disallowed a Maurice Edu goal with six minutes left. There is no doubt that FIFA's continued practice of allowing referees from less-established soccer countries to work World Cup games erased what would have been the greatest comeback in US soccer history. That, however, is another debate for another column.

Those emotional events have to be considered ancient history. The players need to move on and put this behind them if they hope to defeat Algeria. The Desert Foxes can be a better team than we’ve seen thus far. Against Slovenia in their first game, Algeria produced very little and came away with a 1-0 loss. On Friday, they were much more compact and their defense frustrated the English into submission.

Seventeen of the 23 players on the roster were born in France (former French star Zinedine Zidane, who is of Algerian descent, is working as an adviser) and the players have lots of experience playing in Europe’s biggest leagues. However, Algeria has been so inconsistent over the last two games that it will be difficult to prepare for them. For the US, it is a mystery which team will show up.

Before the impressive game against England, Algeria had followed the trend of other African nations at this World Cup by underachieving. Against England, the Algerians dominated possession and played strong defense, resuscitating their hopes of advancing and leaving England, the pre-tournament favorites, walking off the field amid a shower of boos in Cape Town.

“Algeria is a good team. They’re athletic, they’re good defensively, they made some big tackles during that game against England," Clint Dempsey told reporters. “We just have to play our game, keep moving the ball and trying different things, take our opportunities when we can.”

Algeria coach Rabah Saadane is likely to start 24-year-old shot-stopper Rais M’Bolhi, who made his international debut against England, while defenders Nadir Belhadj and Madjid Bougherra will provide strength and control in the back. Bougherra, a teammate of Edu’s and DaMarcus Beasley at Glasgow Rangers, has been exceptionally strong on the right side. Holding midfielder Medhi Lacen broke down England’s predictable plays every chance he got. Scoring against Algeria will be tough for the US as Wayne Rooney so harshly discovered.

The Algerian back line may be solid, but the team lacks offensive firepower (they have scored no goals so far), doing little to create concrete chances in the offensive third. Instead, Algeria’s strength comes in wearing down an opponent with physical play in the midfield and packing the defense. Michael Bradley is a teammate of the Algerian striker Karim Matmour at Borussia Monchengladbach. Matmour is agile and fast with a powerful right foot, but has shown very little at this tournament. He should be of very little concern to the US defense.

“I think we’ve been training for this for six months when we found out the draw, and we’ve been saying all along that we felt it was going to take three games to get through," Tim Howard told reporters. “A win the other day would have been great - maybe would have seen us through. But it’s not like we’re disappointed because we knew that if we played well throughout three games that we would get through the group so that’s still on our minds.”

At the same time, the US needs to avoid some of the pitfalls that have led to the two draws. They may not have had any control over a decision by a referee, but they can’t blame anyone but themselves for getting into a 2-0 hole. The Americans gave Slovenia too much space in the first half, allowing them to score the second goal after the defense was too disjointed. In the second half, the US put more power on the ball and used the wings to push forward into the Slovenian half. Set pieces were key for the US with Donovan doing an exceptional job on the right side.

The US is no stranger to mounting comebacks and getting results when they have their backs to the wall. They did it in World Cup Qualifying and at last year’s Confederations Cup. It’s that spirit that has made this team one of the most exciting to watch at this World Cup.

“We seem to play better when we’re behind and that’s all got to change,” Howard said.

In other words, the Americans need to dictate the pace and tempo against Algeria. The insertion of Edu and Benny Feilhaber in the second half against Slovenia helped create space in the middle, allowing Bradley to show why he is one of the world’s best midfielders with a performance worthy of a mention on the 2010 All-World Cup team.

The knockout stage starts a little earlier for the Americans. A win and they’re in. A doable goal against a beatable team.


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Monday, June 21, 2010

The Daily Soccer

one giant awakens finally, one cinderella is exposed . . .

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Friday, June 18, 2010

The Daily Soccer

better shape than i thought -- Group C Scenarios -- If the USA beat Algeria on Wednesday, they advance to the knockout round. They would also advance if Slovenia beats England and the US draws or beats Algeria. They would also advance if they draw with Algeria and England draws with Slovenia, as long as England doesn’t outscore the USA by two or more goals.

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The Daily Soccer

good grief, this will come down to goal differential eh? - twitter is inaccessible right now - i imagine Brits will set a world tweet record

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The Daily Soccer

We'll have to live with another tie - but both US and England have to win out for us to advance i think - and then we'll have to prepare to play real comp

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The Daily Soccer

i like that we have the guts to pour some strikers in the fire, instead of trying to finagle something from a standard set . . .

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The Daily Soccer

i think i'm going to be sick . . .

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The Daily Soccer

oh my . . . we can't play from a hole forever . . . and so much for bragging on Torres . . .

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The Daily Soccer

oh my . . . this is the craziest and most fun cup in my memory . . .

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The Daily Soccer

Well i was asking Ben Thurber, but your Ben's opinion is equally highly regarded . . . when he's awake of course!

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The Daily Soccer

i'm confused . . . why take out Ozil? . . . especially under the circumstances? . . . you could put fresh legs anywhere! . . . Ben? ideas?

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The Daily Soccer

still reeling over Spain, but pumped for the US game coming up in an hour . . . time to put three more points on the board!

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Thursday, June 17, 2010

OBT: Bart Brinkman

Bart was one of the classiest human beings it has ever been my privilege to know. i feel honored to have been able to work with him over the years. this is a devastating loss, truly an overwhelming loss.

Charles Barton “Bart” Brinkman

KERRVILLE — Charles Barton Brinkman, known to most as “Bart,” passed peacefully on Wednesday, June 16, 2010.

Bart was born on Sept. 27, 1943, to parents George and Nadine Hansen Brinkman, in Frankfort, Ky. He lived in Kerrville as a child and attended school at Starkey Elementary. In 1962, Bart returned to Kerrville following the death of his father.

On June 4, 1966, he married Cheri Hunnicutt, and they were blessed by the birth of a son, Brandon Charles Brinkman, in 1971.

Bart served his country in the United States Air Force, being honorably discharged in 1972. He was a graduate of Schreiner College, the University of Texas School of Pharmacy and Webster University.

While a resident of Kerrville, he worked at Kerrville State Hospital, Gibson’s Pharmacy and Kerrville Veterans Administration, retiring as head of the V.A. Pharmacy in 2005.

For many years, Bart was involved with Hill Country Youth Soccer Association and refereed under the guidelines of AYSO. He also refereed soccer on the high school and college level. He greatly enjoyed his time on the soccer field and all of the people that were involved with those organizations.

In 1983, he was ordained as an Elder at Grace Bible Chapel and continued to serve and bless members there until the time of his passing.

Bart was preceded in death by his father, George Brinkman; a sister, Barbara Brinkman; and his mother-in-law, Wyma Hunnicutt.

He is survived by his wife, Cheri; son, Brandon; daughter-in-law, Jennifer Brinkman; and grandchildren, Makayla, Alexa and Colt, all of Fort Worth, Texas. He also is survived by his mother, Nadine Baldridge of Kerrville; brother, Bruce Brinkman and wife, Peggy, of Bedford, Va.; extended family members, Larry and Meredith Hester, Lois Hester of Houston, Texas; sister-in-law, Mona Workman and husband, Bubba, of Boerne, Texas; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Bart will be remembered as a man of God who had a servant’s heart, a tender spirit and a joyful laugh.

A celebration of Bart’s life will be held at Grace Bible Chapel, 241 Southway Drive South, Kerrville, Texas, on Saturday, June 19, 2010, at 11 a.m., with Pastor Pat Patterson and Lane Conring officiating.

Memorial remembrances may be made to Hill Country Youth Soccer Association, Grace Bible Chapel or a local charity of one’s choice.

The family invites you to send condolences at www.grimesfuneralchapels.com by selecting the “Send Condolences” link.

Funeral arrangements are entrusted to Grimes Funeral Chapels of Kerrville.

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ATH: Some First Round Analysis from USNTPA

From the US National Team Players Association

Winning The First Game

By Michael Lewis -- Ten National Teams must be feeling pretty good about themselves these days in South Africa. Why? They have a better than good chance of reaching the second round of the World Cup.

South Korea, Argentina, Slovenia, Germany, Ghana, the Netherlands, Japan, Brazil, Chile and Switzerland posted wins in their first game, putting them in the drivers seat to play another match day, a fourth match day.

Of course, nothing is automatic in the World Cup. History tells us it is virtually a must to win your first game if you want to participate in the round of 16. The numbers do not lie.

Since group play was instituted for the first round in 1950, countries that win their first match have moved onto the next round 82.5 percent of the time (85-18). Teams that have lost their opening games have gotten out of the first round only 17.6 percent of the time (20-94). And if you tie, you have more than a fighting chance - 61.5 percent (48-30) of playing in the second round.

That's why it was so important for the USA to tie England. The Americans have a lifeline, securing a point in their first match, their most difficult one. That makes Friday's encounter with Slovenia a must-not-lose situation. They can tie the Slovenians (1-0-0, three points) and stay alive, setting up a June 23rd confrontation where they would have to win. Or, they could win and make life a lot easier for themselves.

"The most important thing is... a point in your first game," US right back Steve Cherundolo said. "It doesn't matter who it's against. A loss in the first game of a World Cup in round play is devastating to your chances of making the next round."

Indeed, it is. Just take a look at the US history at the World Cup. The numbers hold quite well.

  • In 1930, the Americans defeated Belgium, 3-0 in their opening game and made it to the semifinals.
  • In 1950, the U.S. dropped a 3-1 decision to Spain and did not get out of its group.
  • In 1990, the Americans were drubbed by the Czech Republic, 5-1, and were eliminated in the first round.
  • In 1994, the hosts managed a 1-1 draw with Switzerland and reached the second round.
  • In 1998, the U.S. dropped a 2-0 decision to Germany and did not qualify for the round of 16.
  • In 2002, the Americans surprised Portugal, 3-2, and managed to reach the quarterfinals, their second-best showing.
  • And in 2006, the U.S. was spanked by the Czech Republic, 3-0, and failed to reach the second round. Incidentally, despite the great start, the Czechs did not make it to the round of 16.

If we read the World Cup tea leaves correctly, the American side should be playing in Rustenburg on June 26th or in Bloemfontein on June 27th. We'll see how that tie holds up for the US when it plays Slovenia on Friday.

Some Historical Background

Just in case you were wondering, the unlucky 18 teams that won their first game but for some reason were eliminated in the opening round were: Yugoslavia (1950), Uruguay ((1962), Argentina (1962), Brazil (1966), Italy (1966), Belgium (1970), Scotland (1974), Italy (1974), Tunisia (1978), Algeria (1982), Hungary (1982), Scotland (1982), Portugal (1986) and Norway (1994), Costa Rica (2002), Argentina (2002), Russia (2002) and the Czech Republic (2006).

The fortunate 20 nations that lost their opening game but reached the second round and beyond were: Yugoslavia (1962), England (1962), Hungary (1966), North Korea (1966), Argentina (1974), West Germany (1982 and reaching the championship game before falling to Italy, 3-1), Argentina (1982), France (1982), Soviet Union (1982), Belgium (1986 - finishing fourth), Spain (1986), England (1986), Argentina (1990 - losing in the championship game to Germany, 1-0), Yugoslavia (1990), Bulgaria (1994 - finishing fourth), Mexico (1994), Italy (1994 - in the championship game to Brazil via penalty kicks), Saudi Arabia (1994), Turkey (2002- finishing third), and Ghana (2006). No team has lost its first match and won the World Cup.

In fact, 13 of those 20 countries advanced thanks to the wild card berths at the 1982, 1986, 1990 and 1994 Cups. Since there won't be any wild card team in 2010, it's just about mandatory to win and survive to play at least another day.


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Wednesday, June 16, 2010

The Daily Silliness

An Oscar for a Turtle

http://ping.fm/icew2

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The Daily Soccer

holy Spanish smokes . . .

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The Daily Soccer

SWITZERLAND!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! oh my . . . and it's about time Torres came on, injured or not . . .

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The Daily Soccer

still the best goal of the cup so far, no matter why - http://ping.fm/YWI1w

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The Daily Soccer

oh i like that Chilean offense . . . but you guys knew i would . . .

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Tuesday, June 15, 2010

The Daily Soccer

Whoa! Two stunning ties so far today . . .

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World Music News Wire #10

New Sounds of Exotica: Tiki Classics Get Shaken, Stirred, and Perfected by the Masterful WAITIKI 7

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Waitiki7_band
Take one part diverse players with intense focus and killer chops, and one part neglected mid-century multi-ethnic hybrid music with origins on America’s harmonious island paradise. Add a dash of Technicolor tropical dreamscape, a twist of wild birdcalls, and stir soulfully.

WAITIKI 7 serves up this polychrome cocktail, taking a new serious spin on exotica, the musical genre that leaped from Hawai‛i’s fashionable bars and clubs to mainstream living rooms in post-War America. Keeping true to exotica’s deep roots and intense demands on musicians with New Sounds of Exotica, the group brings heady passion, acoustic musicianship, and a love of old-school mixology to an art form just begging to be revisited and savored.

Waitiki7_cover The luscious mix that is exotica—the blend of tropical soundscapes, Latin percussion, and popular jazz perfected by Martin Denny, Arthur Lyman, and their ensembles—has been profoundly misunderstood. Far from the kitsch of its waning days, the best exotica flows from two very positive and progressive places: the multi-cultural openness of Hawai‛i’s music scene in the first half of the 20th century, and the mid-century impulses that fueled a craze for transcontinental travel and curiosity about Asian-Pacific cultures.

“It was a huge thing at that time to fly from the West Coast to Hawai‛i,” explains Randy Wong, the Hawai‛i-born, classically trained founder of WAITIKI 7. “It became the stepping stone to the East. People became genuinely fascinated by these cultures. The war was over, and there was a spirit of real optimism and excitement.”

These new travelers came to Hawai‛i and discovered what had been brewing in the relatively open climate of cross-cultural exploration for several decades: a vibrant music scene with everything from mixed Hawaiian and English folk ballads, to second-generation Japanese club bands made of traditional Asian instruments, to Puerto Rican percussionists who had recently come to work in the sugar industry. “The musicians who played exotica came from this scene,” Wong notes. “It was really one of the first popular world-music hybrids in America.”



Enterprising bandleaders brought all these sounds together, creating groups that Wong describes as “one huge rhythm section,” so huge that Martin Denny, the king of classic exotica, needed three trailers to take all the percussion instruments—from gamelan parts to octave after octave of tuned gongs to huge bamboo xylophones—along on tour. WAITIKI 7 lets the full percussive force of exotica shine on tracks like Denny’s Chinese-inflected rumbler “Firecracker.”

Exotica musicians were highly skilled, fastidious arrangers, often drawing on Hollywood experience to craft the perfectly evocative sound of the fantastic tropics. Wong, who has had a chance to study Denny’s scores, was blown away by the level of detail. These were serious musicians “with serious chops,” Wong smiles, and a serious approach to even the campiest moments in the music.

WAITIKI 7 embraces the pulse and ambiance of exotica, while adding their own stamp thanks to the diverse jazz, classical, and folk backgrounds the seven members bring to the group, including the jazz drums of multi-instrumentalist Abe Lagrimas, Jr; the thoughtful and vigorous Latin and jazz piano of Zaccai Curtis; the ever cool vibes of classically trained Jim Benoit.Improvisation and more expansive, expressive solos, something rarely heard in carefully scored classic exotica, play a major role in shaping the band’s sound, as do unexpected instruments from violin (classical virtuoso Helen Liu) to woodwinds of all shapes and sizes (Berklee instructor and Latin jazz master Tim Mayer).

Adding a new dimension to the rhythm sections of the past, lush melodies come to the fore on WAITIKI 7’s tour of exotica standards like the beautiful “Bali Ha‛i” of South Pacific fame. Or on the mysterious yet once wildly popular “Similau,” penned by one of dozens of exotica ghostwriters hired to copy Denny and Lyman’s signature sound—without the prohibitive licensing costs.

“The song does things with Latin rhythms and percussion that never happen. The güiro (notched gourd), for instance, is played backwards, something you just don’t do,” explains Wong. “But it works and makes for one mean song.”

The group comes by its love of exotica honestly. WAITIKI 7 percussionist Lopaka Colon picked up not only his beats, but his amazing bird and animal calls from his father, veteran musician Augie Colon, who played for years with Denny. The senior Colon tracked game in the valleys of Hawai‛i Island and O‛ahu, teaching himself calls to attract birds and animals. When he joined Denny’s group, Augie Colon started tossing in calls to enhance the overall atmosphere, and soon band members were responding, teasingly, in kind.

“It’s exciting, and you can’t help but get into it. When Lopaka whoops and howls, he sounds like some marvelous bird, and he’s playing intense percussion parts at the same time,” Wong enthuses. “The birdcalls are a virtuosic element, and they require an acoustic approach to work well. Samples or keyboards can sound so canned. And it really gives the original exotica musicians like Augie their due.”

Wong himself was exposed to the magic of these calls as a child. He grew up tagging along with his grandfather to hear Arthur Lyman, one of the exotica greats who also used birdcalls for dramatic effect. “We’d be sitting ten feet from the guy and he’d be playing solo vibes and doing birdcalls,” Wong recalls. “It was really otherworldly. I got the sound in my ear, even though I didn’t know it was part of a larger musical thing.”

WAITIKI 7’s originals keep true to the spirit of this larger musical movement, renewing exotica’s ties to Hawaiian culture and moving audience members deeply. Wong’s “Sweet Pīkake Serenade,” inspired by traditional Hawaiian ballads, keeps it so real, it literally makes exotica fans weep. “When we performed for the 500th show of Kansas Public Radio’s Retro Cocktail Hour,” Wong remembers, “there were serious tiki fans who had driven from Chicago, L.A., South Carolina to Lawrence and they had us play for four hours. When we played ‘Sweet Pīkake Serenade,’ the audience started crying tears of joy. We still get fan mail from that gig.”

Tiki culture and its exotica soundtrack have another serious side: the heady cocktails once served alongside the music’s sonic dreamscapes. And just like real exotica demands virtuosic musicianship, real tiki cocktails require premium ingredients artfully balanced: freshly creamed coconuts, just squeezed juices, homemade allspice liqueurs, the clove-lime-almond notes of falernum syrup.

“We’re taking this wholly authentic approach to the music,” Wong explains. “To stay in line with that, we take our cocktails very seriously, in the same vein as us performing acoustically.” Wong and WAITIKI 7 have created several custom cocktails for the album, and recipes are included in the liner notes. “There’s a big tiki revival going on, in places like Boston and New York,” notes Wong, “and exotica is a big part of that.”

Serious tiki fans, as WAITIKI 7 has discovered, turn up in the most unexpected places. Though the band was founded in play at lū‛aus in the Boston area, where many members live, they have played some of the quirkiest gigs imaginable: A bar mitzvah at the New England Aquarium, an Indian wedding held in a New Jersey Greek Orthodox church, an art-deco train chugging through Vermont at the height of mud season.

And last but not least, “We of course do tiki festivals,” Wong chuckles. “Nothing like a field full of New Englanders wearing fezzes and sipping rum barrels to get in the mood. It doesn’t get much better than that.”





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Monday, June 14, 2010

Some World Cup Notes and Ramblings

some things to say: Italy; the US and England's keepers; Lame-o American jocks, nonfans, and press; the ugly stuff; & vuvuzelas

disappointed in the Italy result, however the international press has been pretty skeptical of them in the runup to 2010 . . .

the more i think about (and rewatch) the US-England game the prouder i am . . . i think we did superbly . . .

the Tim Howard Man of the Match award was exactly, EXACTLY, right, and i thought there were plenty of other superb performances . . . notably Gerrard, Terry, Dempsey and Donovan . . . but Howard could not be faulted on the goal at all, and made some saves that are much more difficult than he made them look . . . turning away a dozen shots from a team of world class shooters is BIG . . .

i also think the defense did a better job than i gave them credit for during the game, although i still think we spent too much time confused . . . the scary part of that is that England is not Mr. Creative on the front end, and should we get out of group we have potential to see some fearsomely creative groups . . . perhaps Germany to begin with . . . we need to solve the gap-leaving tendencies we have . . . fast

okay, so i have been there, i know this scenario and i know what happened to Robert Green in goal . . . and i'll explain . . . BUT i want to brag a little about having said, one minute before Dempsey's goal, that Green was looking scary and we should take advantage . . . that's because he seemed distracted, and just a foot out of placement most of the time . . . and, imho, that's what cost him . . . and to start with i both a) feel for him knowing he's taking a beating far worse than he deserves, but b) despite my coming to bat for him in a second, it still was a routine save for a world class keeper . . . all right, here's the technical errors he made -- a) he was a bit lazy, one half-step to his right and he would have been behind the ball (he said this himself sorta, he phrased it a bit different, but the result was the same -- on that shot he had time to get where his body would have blocked the muff); b) that distraction thing -- he was feeling pressured in the minutes leading up to the goal, and i had seen him doing poor things, like, ta-da, not getting behind the ball, making decisions before the play played out, and thus being out of place or playing the ball out to a non-choice setup; c) he was looking up when the ball hit his hands, looking for the playout to come, and so was unprepared for what the ball was doing (more on that in a minute re: Dempsey); and finally, d) something i haven't heard said, but in my mind was probably the most egregious technical error -- he came off his feet, went to his knees, and when the ball got away he had no spring nor body length to recover (which led to the part that looks the worst on camera, him scrambling to reach what looked like a catchable ball) . . . as i said i feel for him, but it was routine, IF you do the technical things right, and virtually all of his technique was poor in the moment . . . and to top it off, it was a dangerous ball (see Dempsey below) . . . for England, it actually was a good thing i think . . . it was so embarrassing that it woke him up and he was every bit world class after that . . . had it been stopped, or had it been a superb goal he had no chance at, i think he might have maintained his complacency, and something like that last Altidore attempt he got a hand on might have won it for the colonists . . .

which brings me to Dempsey's shot . . . i m tired of reading that it was weak, soft, or easy, and that it bounced twice . . . all of it sounding like he tossed a beach ball . . . that's part of the press, UK and US, trying to play up how bad a gaffe it was (it especially makes the non-knowledgeable Yanks looks like they know something! . . . dilettantes), and to downplay that the US even took a shot . . . when the shot happened i thought it was a fine shot, and now that i've seen mutiple replays and especially the parallel low-angle versions, i see that it's what i first thought . . . yes, a) it was not an unreachable screamer, and b) it was still a routine stop for a keeper of Green's caliber, BUT it didn't bounce so much as skip twice, it was well shot from well outside the box, and it not only had some steam on it, but was cycloning too . . . which is the other reason i alluded to above that it was mishandled -- it was a difficult ball, not just one you put your hand in front of and it stops . . . i have played those kind of balls many times, and they do just what that one did, it skips off of, spins around, your hand and it's still moving . . . it hit his hand solid, and yet still had enough oomph to get past him, out of reach and into goal -- it didn't dribble in like molasses . . . and it was likewise that spin-off that created the difficulty for him once he felt it go off his hand, and thus he turned and was unable to get a quick bead on it to know how to react . . .

okay no more excuses, i just wanted to give credit to both sides for something not quite as miserable as it was made out to be . . .

now Slovenia . . . this one is a must-win game, if for no other reason than England is smarting and they're going to take it out on Algeria . . .

the US national press was beyond lame in their post-game assessments . . . both CBS and CNN made huge errors -- getting the wrong name in one case, having a guy playing for the wrong team in the other . . . and both were the lamest reports of a truly bland response, clearly either had a soccer mom writing from her living room, or some lame college grad who partied too hard the night before . . .

i know some people haven't awakened to the fact that soccer in the US has come of age (i'm talking to you Dan!), and that most of why it still seems primitive comes from sportswriters who grew up with the big three and can't get past their own prejudices . . . if you don't know the game, and this is an intellectual game that requires KNOWING it in order to sound even remotely wise (that's the great difficulty about writing on soccer, you have to have an understanding of the game, because it's about the relationships of players on the field, in an ever-changing amoeba, not players lined up, fixed plays, repetitive moves, timeouts, infinite subs, coach's decisions, but a living evolving being of its own -- i've always loved the game as much for the fact that it's a players' game, not a coach's game, you teach what you can teach and you turn the guys loose . . . with football, baseball, basketball can be easy for a writer to fill a page of newsprint, all you have to do is focus on numbers, and voila 'instant knowledge' -- that's a job i held for a decade-plus too, so i know . . . this is also why lame American jock-types are so laughable when they complain about soccer scores, it means to me that they really don't even know the strategy, nuance and depth of much simpler baseball, football and basketball either because they're relying on numbers, that's the limit of their knowledge, a little math) [don't get me started on rules, the folks who know the least about any game are invariably the ones screaming at the ref -- they know nothing else, but by golly they know the rules -- i love folks screaming about either a) offsides being totally mystifying (sheesh, read the book, it's a simple rule -- it's the calling of it that's difficult because the ref has to be focused on two things at once, not because the rules is written in hieroglyphics) , or b) never ever thinking an offsides call is right -- enough of lame-o American broadcasters doing the pedantry every call -- screw that, just show the replay and let those who don't get it revel in their ignorance, while the rest of us don't have to feel like we live someplace so childish that the broadcasters, rarely with any knowledge themselves, talk down to us] . . . anyway, all that to say that i'm embarrassed that in the 21st century we don't have better home coverage in a sport that we are now clearly competitive at on an international level (without inventing the sport ourselves and laying claim to a world title for something no one else plays . . . . ahem . . .)

The Dark Side of the Cup: Slovenia v Algeria wins two big prizes for the tournament so far -- Most Vicious/Ugly Game, and the Tony for Most Theatrical . . . boo hiss . . . and peeved that they're both in our group . . . runners-up team, both categories (although i haven't seen the game yet, but the press has been harsh) Paraguay

and finally, much debate over vuvuzelas . . . my inclination is to say that in an ideal world there is no banning of anything, especially things that make people happy . . . and i love the idea of it anyway . . . BUT in my ideal world, people would have a little more sense . . . like blow the things after a goal, but realize that the incessant blaring probably is ruining the moment for a lot of people who came to watch the game, not toot on a horn . . . how, in fact, do people blowing those things all the time even see, much less enjoy the game . . . much as i would have liked to be at the games, i can say that i'm happier i'm not because of the horns . . . i can watch the game in excruciating detail and turn the sound off . . . which seems to me where the South African Federation AND FIFA would have felt the pinch . . . if the world is turning off the sound on their tubes, then no one is hearing the 'expert' analysis, and more importnatly, and sad in its own way, no one is hearing the commercials . . . all those millions of dollars of advertising wasted . . . hahahahahahahahahaha


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The Daily Soccer

italy?

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The Daily Soccer

Pardon me but . . . ITALY!!!!!

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The Daily Soccer

Netherlands!!!

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Sunday, June 13, 2010

The Daily Silliness

great weekend of seeing folks haven't seen in forever Squeek Reynolds, Charles Bryant, Kelly Bryan, George Albritton, Lauren Brown, Michael Hawkins, Cadi Hawkins

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Saturday, June 12, 2010

The Daily Soccer

Happy

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The Daily Soccer

GAME 1-1 -- well i hoped for more, but it's a good result, we should be proud

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The Daily Soccer

1-1 HT sometimes ugly is mighty pretty . . . http://ping.fm/iKvG7

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The Daily Soccer

0:39 YESSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!
i can legititmately say i told you so -and less than a minute ago
I LOVE YOU CLINT DEMPSEY!!!!

http://ping.fm/iKvG7\

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The Daily Soccer

crap . . .

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The Daily Soccer

GAME TIME!!!!

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The Daily Soccer

http://ping.fm/iKvG7

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ATH: Time now for the biggie

Argetina 1 Nigeria 0 . . . tough but Nigerians should be proud

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ATH: Argentina 1 Nigeria 0

Argentina turning a fine game into something ugly for the last two minutes


i may take that back, there might be a measure if respect there in acknowledging the Nigerians, but that seems dangerous in a 1-0 game . . .

still 99% of it a well-payed game

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ATH: USA v UK Live Blog

Tim Howard for player of the game imho . . . thouhg lots of fine performances -- Gerrard, Johnson, Rooney for a half, Altidore, Donovan, Cherundolo . . .

happier the more i think about it . . .

GAME 1-1 -- well i hoped for more, but it's a good result, we should be proud

ET: England playing content to leave with draw

Gomez can't get in before time called

0:89 CK US

Donovan trying to make it last play as we go to extra


showing 18-12 shots UK

0:88 shot Donovan

someone ringing the doorbell, no way i'm answering the door with 2 minutes left!!

0:85 slowing it down

Holden in for Altidore

0:83 how we escaped that 4 on 2 i don't know, they're killing us at that end . . .

0:81 about ten minutes left with extra time

0:78 that little run shows something important -- England is so dominant right now that they could be complacent and one good break might be all it takes for us . . .

England uses last sub, Crouch in . . . the big guy, and Rooney goes to him immediately . . . not enough that they have us on ups, but they got this NBA guy in the middle now . . .

0:78 Oguchi looks tired . . .

0:77 YES Buddle for Findley, good move . . . we need Findley out to regain composure, and Buddle for fresh legs . . . dangerous legs at that . . .

0:76 another shot England . . . tons of pressure right now, we have to play defense!

0:75 Rooney to a completely unmarked Wright-Phillips -- Howard saves

Rooney shot on the restart, another Howard save . . . Howard is pretty much player of the game right now . .

0:74 Rooney is alive now that we're tiring . . . wide, but Howard was there . . .

0:73 England in the box again

Findley is getting frustrated now, Yellow Card . . . have we got a sub for him, maybe now's the time for fresh blood . . .

0:71 worse yet, we didn't know Rooney was there . . .

say we get out of group, how will we ever deal with a Spain or Brazil or even Italy?

0:70 England is putting six in the box . . .

Roonery wide!

0:68 dang that Altidore shot was much closer to going in than i realized . . . they're having trouble getting replays in becaus the game is so fast . . .

Lampard wastes one

0:67 oooh he finally calls one off the back . . .

0:66 i shouldn't have drunk all that tea . . .

0:65 it may be important that England has only one sub left, and the US has all three . . .

0:64 What a game by the way . . .

0:63 crap that's two guys left open, two great chances by UK, one saved, one wasted . . . BUT we can't let those guys go unmarked


ALTIDORE!!!! Green with his first major save of the game . . .

0:62 Howard!!!!

0:61 is Green scary or what?

0:60 interesting dangerous foul on Dempsey, card? DK from left

0:58 Oguchi can be so solid some times

yellow card Carragher, deserved for a nasty foul . . .

0:57 nice run, looking for long throw . . . nope

Findley seems rather silent . . .

0:55 interesting FK and just as interesting waste out by UK

0:54 Cherundolo right now is playing as good defense as anyone we have

0:53 off the back again . . . tempers will flare before long i fear

0:51 fine hard shot save by Howard !!!!! wide open breakaway too, and wasted bby UK . . . oh their tabloids are going to go nuts on them tomorrow

and Green way out of place at the other end just before

0:50 ref has been good overall, but he's letting them play on the back a lot

great defensive save on Roonery, offside though

0:48 ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh another inside miss by UK , they have to be going crazy over those missed opps

and we have to stop letting them happen

again!!!!

0:47 crap, yellow card for Demerit . . . what was that for? cussing?

HT: well, some few thoughts . . .

Gerrard and Johnson are putting UK in the game, i like too what Terry is accomplishing . . . Gerrard shoud be knighted if they get out of this game with points . . . i was concerned about what taking Milner out might do to them, but Wright-Phillips is just plain dangerous, if a bit flighty . . . they are giving up the wing alot, but the result is Altidore playing more inside and that could cost them . . . the clogged middle has been a bit of a problem for us, but Donovan is still taking advantage of the holes . . . and so is Dempsey . . . am saying i told you so for the seoncd time today . . . Bocanegra's contribution? his coolness is allowing us to make the most of our transitions, and he's the closest thing we have right now to stability in the back . . . well, even subtracting te mishandled goal, Green to me is shaky, and i think that goal took something out of him . . . Howard on the other hand i think is clearly the best keeper on the field, even disregarding Green's mistake . . . Howard and Gerrard right now are my picks for player of the first half . . .

keys? for UK they have to unbottle Rooney offensively, and defensively keep the US top guns out of the middle; for the US, they have to get some kind of communication and collective strategy on the back line, offensively not much needs to be different, shoot, shoot, shoot against a shaken keeper . . .

and where is Spector? is he injured? did i miss something? or just on the bench . . .

well here we go . . .


HT: only three minutes of extra time? hmmmm . . .

1-1 and we'll take it . . . sometimes ugly is really pretty . . .


0:45 well it should have been solved before this, but i hope there's some focus on unscrambling our defense at halftime

0:43 more UK sportsmanship . . . thank you!!

042 Don't forget there should be a TON of injury time this half . . . . cards, Howard, goals

and it looks like Johnson is down, hope he's okay . . . he's been major for them this half . . .

0:40 and a quick turnabout . . .

HOLY SMOKES THOUGH 1-1!!!!!!!!!!!!!

0:39 YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!


i can legititmately say i told you so . . . and less than a minute ago

I LOVE YOU CLINT DEMPSEY!!!!

0:38 i like it when Landon shoots!

crap, yellow card Cherundolo, good call though

Green is a bit scary . . . u hope we take advantage of that . . .

0:35 UK has the ups over the US

0:34 dangerous

0:32 Howard was sharp there

0:32 chance . . . saved

0:31 Wright-Phillips in for Milner UK . . . nice sportsmanship on the restart, thank you UK . . .

0:30 looks like we get Hahnemann? Howard up but not looking sharp . . .

0:27 wasted UK chance, but i don't like that it was unhandled across the box . . .

now BEAUTIFUL save by Howard -- but he's hurt and that i s NOT a good thing, though Hahneman is a fine keeper . . .

0:26 sweet . . . pressure up baby

0:26 good call, yellow Milner -- Donovan opportunity

0:23 Altdore nice serve, Bradley created a couple of nice chances . . . Roonery finally coming to life, he's been quiet, really calm work by both Dempsey and Bocanegra

0:21 US is applying much more pressure than i expected and i like that . . .

0:19 Beautiful defensive save on the breakaway . . . who was that? Onyewu?

0:18 ALMOST ALTIDORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!! what a play in . . . so close

Donovan trying to do a Gerrard, but spending too much time on the ground

0:16 Gerrard is evvvvvverywhere, they're not missing Ferdinand right now . . . and did i miss something? where's Spector . . . does anyone else feel like we're missing his two-ended play?

i like the way everyone looked around to see if the ref was looking on that hand ball . . . just play on as though nothing happened . . .

0:13 looks like we're not communicating intent up front

0:12 serving it up into a crowd is not effective

corner again

0:11 US mids are playing some excellent defense . . . unfortunately the defenders need to also

corner US

0:11 Johnson is dangerous

0:10 Dempsey!!!

0:09 wasted chance by UK . . . going to be the expected very physical game . . .

that was an ugly move in the box on the corner, ref obscured i think

0:06 good call, later on something like that is going to cost a card, but it's too early . . .

0:05 not slowing down

0:03 OMG Goal Gerrard . . . holy crap . . . well it was a very fast first three minutes, it wasn't going to be long for someone . . . replays: he was poorly marked after the dish . . . US defense . . .

0:02 nice place into pressure by Altidore . . . wasting no time serving notice that we'll be dangerous

0:01 immediate block on a Roonery through ball . . . everybody's antennas are up

* * * * * * * *

GAME TIME!!

* * * * * * * *
ENTRY!!! my legs are doing that uncontrollable bouncy thing . . . that's what i get for being add-ocd . . . or maybe it's the half gallon of tex i just drank . . .

* * * * * * * *
teams are warming up, i'm already warm coach, let's go . . .

Univision loves Landon . . . that he speaks excellent Spanish likely plays a part . . .

gotta get in two hours worth of ads now . . .

* * * * * * * *

Okay so i have a history in this that dates before most of you were born . . . and have been through a lot of thrills and heartaches, seen a lot of great players move through, but i believe this is the strongest overall we've ever been, especially offensively . . . if our defense just holds up against the wealth of scoring talent out there, we'll be fine . . . and England is no slouch . . . even missing Ferdinand, they are dangerous . . . but i love our chances . . . besides Altidore and Donovan, i look for Bradley and Dempsey to be game changers . . . and Howard is our best keeper ever imho . . . and i'm tired of waiting, nothing gets my blood going like this, nothing . . . come on game time

Jose Torres, Stuart Holden & Clint Dempsey -- Texas!!

sorry, but Jay Demerit reminds me of Ron Howard . . .

memories suddenly of 1974 . . . Mexico 1 US 0 in that one . . . still get chills . . . was the largest crowd to ever watch a soccer game in Texas until the World Cup came to Dallas a couple decades later . . . forgive my sentimentality . . . excitement too . . .

official US Soccer site pretty lame on the Cup, National Team Players ite superior . . . just sayin'

* * * * * * * *

Not that anyone's listening, but i'm going to live blog my thoughts on the US v England starting at about 12:45 . . .

for now, Argentina v Nigeria is a fun game to watch, no one is sitting back in this one . . . it's 1-0 Arg with about 20 minutes to go, and Argentina is threatening, but Messi seems a little bit off in aim, and Nigeria is making quite a bit of its counterattacks . . .

Ichimura -- best ref so far, gutsy . . . and correct

games watched so far:
Uruguay 0 France 0 (better game than the bloggers would have you believe, more physical than defensive)
Argentina 1 Nigeria 0 (really fine game, Argentina a bit stronger, but Nigeria was worthy of a tie)


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Friday, June 11, 2010

ATH: World Cup!

Lukewarm 0-0 France v Uruguay . . .

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ATH: World Cup!

quoting Colin Stephenson: "89th minute -- How ironic? Henry appealing for a handball by the Uruguayan defender in the box. France, of course, is only in the World Cup because Henry committed a handball that led to a goal against Ireland." http://ping.fm/z7RSu

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ATH: First Game!!!

South Africa 1 Mexico 1 !!!!!!

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ATH: Scouting US v England

TV

ESPN, ESPN Deportes, and Univision have the World Cup: South Africa - Mexico at 10am and Uruguay - France at 2:30pm. All Times Eastern

Scouting Report: England

By Clemente Lisi -- USA - England is one of the most-anticipated first round matches at the World Cup. When it comes to soccer, the Americans and the English are connected in many ways. A common language, the upset in 1950, the influx of American players in the Premiership over the last 15 years, and the English Premier League's popularity on this side of the pond all help fuel the rivalry.

“Look, we’re not as talented as England... period,” Landon Donovan said following the US’s 2-1 win over Turkey in its last friendly at home two weeks ago before flying to South Africa. “That’s the beauty of sports. On any given day, one team can beat another.”

During the World Cup draw last December in Cape Town, dozens of US fans who had gathered at the ESPN Zone in New York’s Times Square were abuzz about the possibility of playing England in South Africa.

“En-gland! En-gland! We want En-gland,” a small, but loud, group of US fans shouted at the TV screens moments. Donovan was sitting in the same restaurant watching the screens as his Los Angeles Galaxy teammate David Beckham plucked out a plastic ball that put the US in Group C along with England. A nervous smile came over his face.

“It could have been worse,” Donovan said with a sigh and a smirk.

Six months later and that dream match-up - a rematch of the US’s 1-0 shocker over England at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil - is now just a day away.

Indeed, of the eight groups at the World Cup, Group C is the only one with two clear favorites - England and the US - to go through to the next round. Even though most expect the English and Americans to leave Slovenia and Algeria behind, the US would be doing itself some harm if it underestimates these two sides.

The Americans open against the Three Lions, a tough first game, although the English have had a knack for ultimately being a disappointment at the tournament. England is stacked with talent (minus David Beckham who ruptured his left Achilles tendon in a game with AC Milan this past March and their captain Rio Ferdinand injured in training) and has a roster very familiar to the legions of Americans that follow the Premiership every weekend.

Wayne Rooney, Frank Lampard and Steven Gerrard will all be there. So will Tim Howard, Clint Dempsey, and Donovan - players with EPL experience of their own - in what promises to be an epic game.

“It’s going to be a lot for (the US) to handle,” said ESPN analyst and former Germany coach Jurgen Klinsmann. “Having said that, the US has very little to lose. It’s the first game and the US can afford to lose if it can pick up points in its subsequent two games.”

England has been inconsistent lately. Unconvincing wins over Mexico (3-1) and Japan (2-1 thanks to two own goals) in warm-up matches last month revealed a series of problems. Theo Walcott struggled to gain his form in recent weeks and was cut from the 23-man roster, while defender Rio Ferdinand injured himself in practice last week and is out of the tournament.

The problems don’t end there. With no obvious candidate for the midfield holding role and questions swirling on who will be the first-choice goalkeeper have given their Italian-born coach Fabio Capello sleepless nights and possibly have him rethinking his 4-5-1 formation.

Against Japan, England's defense played like a group of strangers who had gotten together for the first time for a pick-up game in the park. Although pre-World Cup friendlies are no real measure of how a team will ultimately perform, it did come at a bad time. Just when a team should be gelling, the English are not at all the well-drilled unit needed to succeed in South Africa.

Capello has repeatedly said that the only way for England to win - to steal a phrase from his more successful countryman Marcello Lippi – is for “the spirit of the group” to emerge as a dominating factor on a team of individual stars. Easier said than done. Lippi did that four years ago with the Azzurri. Capello still has a long way to go.

The surprise exclusion of Darren Bent means that the English will be without one of the Premiership’s top scorers. For Bent, it was the second time in four years that he's failed to crack the World Cup roster. A consistently solid attacking player, Bent tallied an impressive 24 goals for Sunderland in the EPL this past season - only Rooney scored more among English-born players.

Although he called up 59 players since taking over in 2008, Capello has done little to the core group that played so poorly under Sven-Goran Eriksson at Germany '06. While the nagging question of whether Gerrard can play alongside Lampard in central midfield rages on, Capello is likely to gamble and deploy that combo against the US. In other words, Capello is banking on established stars to try and make a run of it at this World Cup. For the US, it means having to play against a group that is very familiar to them - an edge Bob Bradley's men will have to capitalize on.

An unheralded player who can make the difference in the back for England is Jamie Carragher. He may not possess style, but is under pressure with his ball control skills. Rooney is the striker everyone fears, but he is currently on a five-game scoring drought. Whether he has lost his scoring touch remains to be seen, but Rooney’s inability to find the back of the net is something that bodes well for the US. Confidence, meanwhile, is high among the Americans after last Saturday’s 3-1 demolition of Australia.

Donovan, who played for Everton this past season during a very successful loan spell, said playing in the EPL has improved him and he’s ready for the challenge.

“It made me a better player,” he said. “I learned a lot technically and tactically from playing there. I think it’s really going to be a great game.”

Goalkeeper Tim Howard, a Premiership vet who plays for Everton, said England would play conservatively in given that it’s the tournament’s first game for both sides.

“England is a fantastic team. We going to have to defend as a group and attack the ball in packs,” he said. “They will establish the rhythm as a team, like all big teams usually do, but we have to play our game. I suspect they will be a little bit tight.”

The Americans are hoping for a repeat upset of 1950. England is looking to start the tournament without what would be seen as a substantial setback. The stakes are high, exactly what both countries should want on the game's biggest stage... if maybe not so soon.

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COM: Damned Cartoons

NEW YORK, June 11, 2010

"SpongeBob" Helps Boy Save Friend From Drowning

Andrew Gentile, of N.J., Wanders into Deep Water; Friend Reese Ronceray Rescues Him with Know-How from Lifeguarding Episode

Five-year-old Andrew Gentile, left, was saved from drowing by his 8-year-old neighbor, Reese Ronceray, at right.

(CBS) An 8-year-old New Jersey boy saved his 5-year-old neighbor from drowning last weekend with a technique he says he learned from the Nickelodeon cartoon "SpongeBob SquarePants."

Andrew Gentile was struggling in a manmade lake in Washington Township. He'd been playing in a shallow area, but wandered into deeper water. His mother, Shirley, tried to help, but she panicked herself when she lost her footing in the six-foot deep water.

That's when Reese Ronceray remembered the strokes from a scene in the episode "SpongeGaurd on Duty," and came to the rescue. He told "Early Show" co-anchor Maggie Rodriguez he ran and jumped into the water.

Reese said he grabbed Andrew around the shoulders and started paddling.
"I started swimming to shore, but before I grabbed him we just plopped and (went) under the water."

Rodriguez said, "That must have been scary."

Reese replied, "Very."

He said, "I just kept (moving my arms) up all the way to the surface."

Rodriguez asked, "You were just using one arm and holding him with the other?"

Reese added, "And two legs."

Rodriguez asked Andrew, "What do you say to your friend for saving your life?"

Reese told his friend, "Thank you."

Andrew responded, "You're welcome."

Reese added, "His mom was like, 'Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.'"

Reese's mom, Anne, said she's "so proud" of her son.

"I'm amazed that he even jumped into the water," she said. "He's only had some lessons for a couple of years. I didn't think he could life-save. I saw Andrew having some problems and the next thing I knew, I saw Reese in the water."

Anne continued, "I was like, 'Oh, man, I'll have to jump in myself. But Reese came back up and had Andrew in the crook of his arm and swam right to shore."

Nickelodeon is proud, too:

David Bittler, spokesman for Nickelodeon, released in a statement, "We are so happy to hear that Andrew is OK, and we're proud that 'SpongeBob' could inspire a great kid like Reese to be a hero."

Rodriguez remarked, "A lot of people aren't sure about letting people watch cartoons, but they obviously have some redeeming value."

"Early Show" contributor child and adolescent psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein said, "Cartoons absolutely do (have benefits). And Reese is surely to be commended for staying calm under pressure. He really kept a cool head, use he what he saw on television and made it happen. But I think we can't forget how important it is to watch these shows with our kids, to really make sure they understand what it is they're watching. And that's really the trick I think at the end of the day is to make sure that everybody's on the same page with what it is they're watching and understand it so that they can put these great opportunities in to play and really help their friends out, which is a wonderful ending to a potentially tragic story."

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OBT: Jean Evans

June 9, 2010
Betty Jean Evans

Betty Jean Evans of Blanco, Texas, was carried away on the wings of Angels Wednesday, June 9, 2010. She was born in Blanco on February 7, 1928, to Alex Baxter Evans and Pearl Elizabeth Massey Evans, who predeceased her. She is also predeceased by brothers Ray Evans and Holmes Evans and sisters Frances Wagner, Virgil Williams and Venita Beall.


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Thursday, June 10, 2010

The Daily Silliness

Another BP Spill!!!

http://ping.fm/jFXLC

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ATH: Greed Ruins Another Good Thing . . .

What's new, i wish our society would somehow develop a feel for enough being enough, to maybe come to grips with having enough money that one doesn't need to ruin every nice thing that comes along . . . not in mylifetime i guess . . .

http://ping.fm/MLyHA

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Wednesday, June 09, 2010

THE: Neverending Story at The Point

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Tuesday, June 08, 2010

The Daily Silliness

Yup, more linguistic lunacy from the major networks . . .

Here's one from CBS today (6/8): They did what?

"A group of protesters donned in orange shirts, some in wheelchairs, started shouting minutes after Pelosi began speaking at the America's Future Now conference, according to reports."


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World Music News Wire #9

The Body’s Hum, the Desert’s Joy: Footsteps in Africa Soundtrack: Nomadic Remix Brings Nomad Freedom to the Dancefloor and Water to the Sahara

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There’s a sound you hear in the desert, a hum that can only be felt in the deepest silence. It is the high tone of vibrating nerves, the rush of blood in the veins. It’s the ultimate beat, the dance of the body itself.

This sound lies behind filmmaker, producer, and former VJ Kathi von Koerber’s three-part exploration of the life, worldview, and creativity of the nomadic Tuareg peoples of the Sahara. Envisioned from the start as a feature-length documentary film and soundtrack, Footsteps in Africa (KiahKeya Productions; 2009) reveals the vibrant cultural life of the world’s most forbidding climate and is coming to select festivals across North America and the world in 2010.

FSAlbumCover The sounds Von Koerber uncovered deep in the desert find new resonances on re-imagined tracks of Footsteps in Africa Soundtrack: Nomadic Remix. Brought together by producer and conscious compiler Joshua Jacobs of Ambient Groove, DJs from across the planetary dance floor—from the ambient healing of Rara Avis to the worldly downtempo of the Kaya Project, from rising stars like DimmSummer to global remix icons like Cheb i Sabbah—explore the nature of the desert and its unexpectedly global nomadic denizens, with part of the profits going directly back to Tuareg communities.

“In the desert, there are no birds, no trees, just this denseness. You feel an amazing hertz frequency,” von Koerber explains. So she and soundtrack composer Jamshied Sharifi decided they needed to do something innovative. They invited throat singer Benno Klandt to vocalize over the entire film, a subtle sound only audible on a good sound system yet quietly uniting the soundtrack.

This sound, the hidden hum of the desert, was instantly picked up on by dubstepper Solar Lion. He added a sitar and brought the desert buzz front and center on his remix of the film’s “End Titles.” “You listen to this track and all of a sudden, you can hear it,” Von Koerber smiles; “the tone of the desert.”

DJs had unusually rich material to play with as they created their remixes. Von Koerber, in the process of filming and recording, went to festivals throughout the Tuareg region, events where nomads from Mali, Mauritania, Burkina Faso, and Niger met and made music together. There, tent jams go on for days on end and put events like Burning Man to shame.

“Westerners gather in mad chaos, but at festivals like the one in Goosi, where some of the tracks were recorded, it’s all about the community, singing together for hours,” von Koerber explains. ”The people who come out live in desert all the time. They hold family and tribal conferences. The music and the gatherings have the intention of promoting exchange and peace at meetings that can’t take place anywhere else.”

In addition to striking on-the-spot recordings, von Koerber enlisted some of the best popular performers from North Africa, such as Moroccan trance legend Hassan Hakmoun. Sharifi, a Persian-American composer with a strong jazz and classical background and an unfailing global ear, brought this varied vibrant soundscape together to support Von Koerber’s vivid images.

The eclectic international approach echoes the Tuaregs’ own distant roots, which stretch back through North African to Spain and Yemen to India, in a centuries-long journey resembling that of the Roma. “If you speak with Tuareg leaders and elders,” Von Koerber notes, “they’ll tell you they came from the east originally.”

Cheb i Sabbah embraces the entire geographic scope of their travels with his artful analog meets digital touch on “Hyena,” while New York global beat masters Nickodemus and EarthRise SoundSystem weave in elements from Asia to Africa. On “Open,” Bombay Dub Orchestra took Hakmoun’s gritty and compelling voice and emphasized its power by bringing in unexpected acoustic instruments like the djembe. “The DJs really felt what needed to happen and what was right for the desert,” von Koerber enthuses. “They took it to a whole new level.”

Von Koerber and her collaborators’ engagement with the stunning sights and sounds of the Sahara stretches into new territory, as well. She, along with groups like Reality Engine (“Tuareg Goosi Jam Audio-Visual Remix”), hope to transform Tuareg tracks into multi-platform creations people can experience live. “I’ve spent a decade creating installations and multi-media presentations,” explains von Koerber. “I’d like to bring that to dancers and listeners, the images and animation that emphasize the message of the music and the film.”

Water and music often intertwine in Tuareg proverbs and songs. As von Koerber puts it, “Water gives life to the body, as music gives life to the soul.” To honor this understanding, fifteen percent of all profits from the remix album will be returned to the community, to support clean water projects. “I wanted to bring the film back to them,” Von Koerber reflects. “It’s their voice, words and thoughts translated. The music and film are representations of them, and I wanted to give back.”

Instead of simply writing a check to charity, von Koerber is using her close ties to Tuareg community leaders to improve wells and purchase covers and new pumping systems as part of the Nomadic Villagers Clean Water Awareness Fund. This collaborative charitable initiative between KiahKeya Productions, the Indigenous Cultural Educational Center, and local Tuareg leaders featured in the film will make simple yet vital changes to improve daily life, yet not alter it radically from its traditional nomad roots.

Along with helping the bold and hardy people who captured her imagination years ago as she backpacked through her native Africa, von Koerber, herself a global trans-cultural nomad, feels the Tuareg have something valuable to give the world. “The Tuareg are nomads, and freedom is their music,” muses von Koerber. “The album awakens you to the nomad in every one of us. It brings you to that joy you feel in the desert, by getting you out on the dance floor. That joy is like water: we all need it.”

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